Best 0% APR Credit Cards

These cards offer an outstanding 0% intro APR on purchases, balance transfers, or both. This can help you finally get your debt managed and under control by transferring an existing balance, or can help you fund a bigger purchase. Our experts have analyzed 1,002 different credit card offers with a 0% introductory APR period and listed the 10 best no interest offers from our partners to suit different spending habits.

These cards offer an outstanding 0% intro APR on purchases, balance transfers, or both. This can help you finally get your debt managed and under control by transferring an existing balance, or can help you fund a bigger purchase. Our experts have analyzed 1,002 different credit card offers with a 0% introductory APR period and listed the 10 best no interest offers from our partners to suit different spending habits.

Summary

Best 0% APR Credit Cards

Good to Excellent

Credit Recommended (670-850)

Apply Now

Intro Bonus

Cashback Match™
Discover will match all the cash back you've earned at the end of your first year, automatically. There's no signing up. And no limit to how much is matched.

At A Glance

0% Intro APR Purchase Period
6 months
0% Intro APR Balance Transfer Period
18 months
Regular APR
13.49% - 24.49% variable

Good to Excellent

Credit Recommended (670-850)

Apply Now

Intro Bonus

No current offer

At A Glance

0% Intro APR Purchase Period
18 months
0% Intro APR Balance Transfer Period
18 months
Regular APR
15.49% - 24.99% variable
See Rates & Fees, Terms Apply

Good to Excellent

Credit Recommended (670-850)

Apply Now

Intro Bonus

$150
Earn a $150 statement credit after you spend $1,000 in purchases on your new Card within the first 3 months.

At A Glance

0% Intro APR Purchase Period
15 months
0% Intro APR Balance Transfer Period
15 months
Regular APR
12.99% - 23.99% variable
See Rates & Fees, Terms Apply

Good to Excellent

Credit Recommended (670-850)

Apply Now

Intro Bonus

$150
Earn a $150 statement credit after you spend $1,000 or more in purchases with your new Card within the first 3 months of Card Membership.

At A Glance

0% Intro APR Purchase Period
15 months
0% Intro APR Balance Transfer Period
15 months
Regular APR
12.99% - 23.99% variable

Good to Excellent

Credit Recommended (670-850)

Apply Now

Intro Bonus

No current offer

At A Glance

0% Intro APR Purchase Period
12 months
0% Intro APR Balance Transfer Period
21 months
Regular APR
13.74% - 23.74% variable

Good to Excellent

Credit Recommended (670-850)

Apply Now

Intro Bonus

No current offer

At A Glance

0% Intro APR Purchase Period
12 months
0% Intro APR Balance Transfer Period
21 months
Regular APR
14.74% - 24.74% (Variable)

Good to Excellent

Credit Recommended (670-850)

Apply Now

Intro Bonus

$150
Earn a $150 Bonus after you spend $500 on purchases in your first 3 months from account opening.

At A Glance

0% Intro APR Purchase Period
15 months
0% Intro APR Balance Transfer Period
15 months
Regular APR
16.49% - 25.24% variable

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Editorial disclosure: All reviews are prepared by CreditCards.com staff. Opinions expressed therein are solely those of the reviewer and have not been reviewed or approved by any advertiser. The information, including card rates and fees, presented in the review is accurate as of the date of the review. Check the data at the top of this page and the bank's website for the most current information.


Comparing zero interest credit card offers

Updated: March 25, 2020

During these turbulent times, credit card debt is something that can be a cause for worry. With the current uncertainty about the economy, it is important to practice an overabundance of caution with our finances. However, sometimes life doesn’t work out that way. We might have had back-breaking medical bills. Or the car broke down again. The fact is, while credit cards are partly for convenience, sometimes they can seem rather inconvenient because of a steep balance.

While not a cure-all, a card with a 0% APR offer on purchases, balance transfers or both can help pull you up out of ever-building debt by temporarily halting the interest charges that come with carrying a balance. We evaluated over 1,000 credit cards with a 0% intro APR offer and calculated the estimated savings of each offer and the other benefits for each card. Here, we look at:


best 0 apr credit cards

Best 0% Interest Credit Cards of 2020

Discover it® Cash Back

Why it’s the best 0% APR credit card for rotating category rewards

Offering to double your cash back at year end, this card can earn you up to $600 in cash back your first year with its 5% back on select categories up to the quarterly maximum of $1,500 in purchases after activating, making it $300 for the year, then another $300 at year-end. Categories for Q1 2020 include the super-practical category of groceries, along with Walgreens and CVS purchases.

Pros

The Discover it Cash Back has one of the lowest variable APRs among 0% interest cards, with 13.49% – 24.49%, which is handy if you think you may carry a balance after the no interest offer ends. Also, the rewards are strong, even with no sign-up bonus.

Cons

While decent, the intro offer of 14 months of 0% interest on purchases and balance transfers isn’t the longest offer out there – if your primary concern is to pay a sizeable balance off while avoiding interest charges, you may want to look elsewhere. There also isn’t a lot in the way of purchase and travel benefits with this card.

Read Creditcards.com’s full review of the Discover it® Cash Back

Discover it® Balance Transfer

Why it’s the best 0% intro APR credit card for low variable APR

The Discover it Balance Transfer has one of the lowest starting regular APRs, at 13.49%-24.49% variable, which means that strong credit and a low balance might get you an interest rate well below the national average.

Pros

This card’s 5% cash back on rotating categories (which requires a quarterly sign-up and a max $1,500 quarterly spend, then 1%) makes this one of the best 0% intro APR cards when it comes to ongoing rewards. It’s 0% for 18 months on balance transfers, then 13.49%-24.49% variable after that.

Cons

Although there is an end-of-first-year bonus on this card (double your cash back at the end of your first year), there is no sign-up bonus, and the 0% intro APR on purchases is only 6 months (it’s 13.49%-24.49% variable after that)

Read Creditcards.com’s full review of the Discover it® Balance Transfer

Wells Fargo Platinum card

Why it’s the best 0% APR credit card for excellent credit

For the consumer with excellent credit and an upcoming purchase that you want to avoid paying interest on, the Wells Fargo Platinum may just be the card to suit.

Pros

This card is one of our favorites for both 0% intro APR on purchases and qualifying balance transfers – pay no interest for 18 months, then it’s 15.49%-24.99% variable.

Cons

This card has no sign-up bonus or ongoing rewards, and the regular APR starts out high at 15.49%-24.99% variable.

Read Creditcards.com’s full review of the Wells Fargo Platinum card

Blue Cash Everyday® Card from American Express

Why it’s the best 0% APR credit cards for good credit

Your credit card possibilities open up considerably when you have good credit, and the Blue Cash Everyday is a prime example. With a strong 0% intro APR and excellent rewards on this card, it’s easy to see why good credit is worth attaining.

Pros

The go-to rate for the Blue Cash Everyday, at 12.99%-23.99% variable APR, compares well with other 0% intro APR cards, and the 0% offer is 15 months on purchases and balance transfers (then it reverts to the go-to rate).

Cons

There’s a lot to love about this card, but one possible downside is that if you have a need for a longer 0% intro APR offer on purchases or balance transfers, you may have to forego this card’s rewards for better low interest intro APR terms.

Read Creditcards.com’s full review of the Blue Cash Everyday® Card from American Express

American Express Cash Magnet® Card

Why it’s the best 0% APR credit card for no annual fee

This card goes toe-to-toe with other cash back cards, not only in the rewards arena, but also by offering 0% intro APR on purchases and balance transfers for 15 months (it’s 12.99%-23.99% variable APR after that).

Pros

Looking for a cash back card with oomph? With the Cash Magnet, you can earn a $150 credit statement after a $1,000 spend within the first 3 months and 1.5% cash back on all purchases.

Cons

Unfortunately, as an American Express card, the Cash Magnet would not be widely accepted overseas because the American Express network doesn’t have much of a presence beyond U.S. borders. Besides, there’s a 2.7% foreign transaction fee with this card (see rates and fees).

Read Creditcards.com’s full review of the American Express Cash Magnet® Card

Citi® Diamond Preferred® Card

Why it’s the best 0% APR credit card for balance transfer

It’s hard to find a card that matches the Diamond Preferred’s intro 0% interest offer, making it the best in its class among cards that accept excellent credit. Also, its regular APR of 13.74%-23.74% variable starts out lower than the Citi Simplicity.

Pros

The Diamond Preferred stands out for its no interest offer on balance transfers – get it for 21 months, then 13.74%-23.74% variable APR after that.

Cons

This card has no sign-up bonus and no ongoing rewards, which means you’ll need to consider whether it’s a good card for the long haul. Also, the 0% interest offer on purchases is only 12 months (it’s 13.74%-23.74% variable APR after that).

Read Creditcards.com’s full review of the Citi® Diamond Preferred® Card

Citi Simplicity® Card

Why it’s the best 0% APR credit card for no late fees

If you struggle to pay on time or keep track of due dates, this card’s forgiving fee and penalty policy will be a lifesaver. It’s one of the only cards that charges absolutely no late payment fee or penalty APR, no matter how many times you pay late.

Pros

You’ll get 21 months to chip away at a transferred balance while paying no interest (the APR is 14.74%-24.74% after that). You can also take advantage of the card’s 0% APR for the first 12 months on new purchases (14.74%-24.74% thereafter) to finance large expenses over time.

Cons

Since it offers no rewards program and few notable perks, the card will have little long-term value for most cardholders. The balance transfer fee is also steep (5% or $5, whichever is higher). You may be better off with a card that charges no balance transfer fee, even if it offers a shorter promotional APR period.

Read Creditcards.com’s full review of the Citi Simplicity® Card

Chase Freedom Unlimited®

Why it’s the best 0% APR credit card for flexible rewards

In addition to statement credits, this card’s earnings can be partnered with select Chase cards to earn extra travel redemptions through Chase Ultimate Rewards, allowing you to earn up to a 50% boost on those rewards.

Pros

The Chase Freedom Unlimited’s intro offer of 0% interest for 15 months on purchases and balance transfers is the right choice for a consumer with a moderate amount of debt (it’s 16.49%-25.24% variable APR after that). Also, the sign-up bonus and ongoing rewards are quite nice.

Cons

With a high variable go-to rate of 16.49% – 25.24% APR, the Freedom Unlimited isn’t the best choice for carrying a balance after the zero interest intro offers end. Also, the balance transfer fee is crazy high.

Read Creditcards.com’s full review of the Chase Freedom Unlimited®

BankAmericard® credit card

All information about Bank of America Cards has been collected independently by CreditCards.com and has not been reviewed by the issuer. Bank of America Cards are no longer available through CreditCards.com

Why it’s the best overall credit card for 0% intro APR

The BankAmericard has one of the longest offers on balance transfers at 18 billing cycles with 0% interest (then 14.49% – 24.49% variable APR) on transfers made within the first 60 days and 18 billing cycles on purchases.

Pros

Not only is there no annual fee, there’s no penalty APR with the BankAmericard, meaning paying late won’t automatically raise your interest rate. Other account pricing and terms apply.

Cons

There is a time limit to when you must make your balance transfers in order to take advantage of the introductory rate offer: within the first 60 days. Also, this card has no sign-up bonus and no ongoing rewards.

Read Creditcards.com’s full review of the BankAmericard® credit card

Summary of 0% intro APR Credit Card Offers

Credit Card Best For: 0% APR – Balance Transfers 0% APR – Purchases Regular APR CreditCards.com Rating
Discover it® Cash Back Rotating category rewards 14 months 14 months 13.49% – 24.49% Variable 3.9 / 5
Discover it® Balance Transfer Low interest 18 months 6 months 13.49% – 24.49% Variable 4.5 / 5
Wells Fargo Platinum card Excellent credit 18 months** 18 months 15.49% – 24.99% Variable 4.4 / 5
Blue Cash Everyday® Card from American Express Good credit 15 months** 15 months 12.99% – 23.99% Variable 3.5 / 5
American Express Cash Magnet® Card No annual fee 15 months** 15 months 12.99% – 23.99% Variable 2.9 / 5
Citi® Diamond Preferred® Card Balance transfer 21 months 12 months 13.74% – 23.74% Variable 3.9 / 5
Citi Simplicity® Card No late fees 21 months 12 months 14.74% – 24.74% Variable 3.7 / 5
Chase Freedom Unlimited® Flexible rewards 15 months 15 months 16.49% – 25.24% Variable 3.9 / 5
BankAmericard® credit card ^ 0% intro APR 18 billing cycles* 18 billing cycles 14.49% – 24.49% Variable 3.9 / 5

*for balance transfers made in the first 60 days
**for qualifying balance transfers

Research methodology

0% intro APR credit cards analyzed: 1,002

Criteria used: 0% intro APR period for purchases, 0% intro APR period for balance transfers, balance transfer fee, regular APR, other rates and fees, rewards rates, extra benefits and features, customer service, credit needed, ease of application, security

How do 0% APR credit cards work?

A 0% intro APR offer allows you to carry a balance month to month while paying no interest for a set amount of time, up to 21 months. Then the regular APR kicks in, which is typically a variable rate within a specific range.

These are great cards for paying off a card balance (or two) without incurring more interest charges. They are also good for consolidating debt into a single payment. These cards can sometimes offer 0% APR on purchases for a limited time. With balance transfers, you can avoid the debilitating costs of interest fees, which can number in the thousands of dollars over time. Surprisingly, two-thirds of consumers we polled said they had never applied for a credit card to pay 0% on a new purchase.

Have you ever applied for a credit card to pay 0% on a new purchase?…

  • Yes, and I got the 0% APR card
  • 26%
  • Yes, but I wasn’t approved
  • 7%
  • No, I’ve never applied for a 0% card
  • 45%
  • No, I didn’t know 0% APR cards existed
  • 23%

CreditCards.com November 2018 0%/BT survey

What to look for in a credit card with no interest

Unlike other types of loans, credit cards have several APRs, which we look at here.

  • Regular APR – This APR is applied when you make a purchase. When you allow the balance to carry over past the grace period, you face interest charges. This is the most common interest rate on a credit card.
  • 0% intro APR on purchases – If you make purchases while your card has a 0% intro APR offer on purchases, you will not pay interest, provided you follow the issuer’s rules. Once the offer ends, if a balance remains, the go-to rate kicks in.
  • 0% intro APR on BT – When you transfer a balance to a new card, if there is a 0% intro APR offer, you will not pay interest during the offer period, provided you don’t violate any rules. If there is a balance after the offer ends, the go-to rate kicks in.
  • Go-to APR – A go-to APR, typically the regular APR, is the rate you pay once a 0% intro APR period ends.
  • Penalty APR – If you aren’t making payments – in other words, you are delinquent – you can face this rate. This rate is quite a bit higher than the other rates. Some cards, such as the Discover cards, don’t have a penalty APR.
  • Cash advance APR – When you take out a cash advance, such as when you make an ATM withdrawal, you are charged this rate. While not as high as the penalty rate, it is typically higher than purchase or balance transfer APRs. There is no grace period with a cash advance, so count on being charged interest from day one.

Other factors to consider

  • Balance transfer fee – Most cards that allow balance transfers charge a fee, which is usually 3%. A few cards waive this fee, which can save you hundreds of dollars, depending on your balance.
  • Rewards – When you are looking for rewards in a 0% credit card, there’s usually a tradeoff – if there are rewards, the 0% offer is typically lower than a card that exclusively offers 0% on balance transfers and/or purchases. Rewards can come in sign-up bonuses, ongoing rewards or both.
  • Annual fee – Most cards with a 0% intro offer have no annual fee, although there are a few that do, so check before committing.

Comparing two 0% interest card offers

As we mentioned, there are a number of factors to consider when choosing your 0% intro APR card, including rewards, length of the purchase and balance transfer offers, annual fee and balance transfer fee.

Here, we look at the Amex EveryDay®† Card and the Chase Freedom Unlimited. Both have no annual fee and both offer 0% intro APR on balance transfers and purchases for 15 months. After that, the Freedom Unlimited has a higher go-to APR of 16.49%-25.24% variable, while the EveryDay’s is 13.99%-24.99% variable.<

For our purposes we average that consumers spent $21,765 on consumer credit cards in 2018, based on our analysis of this 2019 Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection report. The same consumer had an average of $5,294 of card debt. We compare the cards in the first year of card membership; the second year; and the benefits offered.

Compare the 1st year value

Card: Amex EveryDay†
Amex EveryDay card
Chase Freedom Unlimited
Chase Freedom Unlimited
Welcome offer: 10,000 points ($100)
after $1,000 spend in first 3 months
$150
after $500 spend within first 3 months
Rewards rate: 2 points per dollar on U.S. supermarket purchases ($6,000 limit on purchases per year, 1% thereafter),
1 point per dollar other purchases
1.5% cash back on all purchases
Spending: Groceries: $5,005*2 points=
10,010 points ($100)
Other qualified purchases: $16,758*1 point=
16,758 points ($168)
20% bonus on qualified purchases: 26,768 points*20%=
5,354 points ($54)
$21,765*1.5%=
$326
Cost of balance transfer: $0
when made within the first 60 days
$159
Annual Fee: $0 $0
1st year value: $422 $317

Compare the 2nd year value

Card: Amex EveryDay†
Amex EveryDay card
Chase Freedom Unlimited
Chase Freedom Unlimited
Spending: Groceries: $5,005*2 points=
10,010 points ($100)
Other qualified purchases: $16,758*1 point=
16,758 points ($168)
20% bonus on qualified purchases: 26,768 points*20%=
5,354 points ($54)
$21,765*1.5%=
$326
Annual Fee: $0 $0
2nd year value: $322 $326

Compare the card benefits

Card: Amex EveryDay†
Amex EveryDay card
Chase Freedom Unlimited
Chase Freedom Unlimited
Card benefits: Free access to credit score
Purchase protection
Car rental loss and damage insurance
Exclusive access to ticket presales & and cardmember-only events
Global assist hotline
Free access to credit score
Purchase protection
Extended warranty
Car rental insurance
Baggage delay insurance
Roadside dispatch
Travel accident insurance

What is the impact of credit card interest fees?

Yes, credit card interest fees raise your debt, but they can also make it difficult to pay down that debt if you are paying the minimum each month. Here, we look at how they can cost you money, how your credit score impacts them and more.

How your credit score impacts your ongoing interest rate

The regular interest rate on your credit card is based primarily on your credit score, which in turn is informed by the amount you owe compared to your available credit as well as your on-time payments. The higher your score, the lower your risk to the bank, and therefore the lower the interest rate you will likely get.

How higher interest rates can cost you money

You know now that paying down your debt is optimal, but high interest rates can increase the total amount you pay in interest and delay your payoff timeline. Most credit cards have a variable rate, anywhere from 14%-27%. The rate you are given by the card issuer depends in part on your creditworthiness.

  • Say you owe $5,000 and you are assigned a 14% interest rate. If you pay down $300 each month, it will take you 19 months and you will pay $592.79 in interest.
  • Now, take that same $5,000 but with 27% interest. If you pay the same $300 each month, it will take you 22 months and it will cost you $1,337.32 in interest.
  • As you’ve probably figured out, the sooner you pay the debt, the less in interest you’ll pay. But the interest rate is another huge factor, as you’ve seen. Check out our handy-dandy calculators to crunch the numbers yourself and see how you can minimize your interest charges.

Use Creditcard’s.com’s payoff calculator to find out how much you are paying in interest.

Strategies to avoid paying credit card interest

Take advantage of your grace period

We’ve found that you can save roughly $200 a year when you take advantage of your grace period. But that means that you pay in full before the deadline each month to qualify.

Pay in full each month

You may know that you should pay in full each month to avoid interest charges, but here’s a tip – consider paying the balance off multiple times a month. Why? Because it will help keep your credit utilization ratio low, thereby helping your credit score.

Manage your credit card weekly

We run the risk of overcharging on credit cards because we don’t “see” the transaction – in other words, money doesn’t leave our hands. By managing your credit card on a weekly cadence, you are less likely to go over your budget because you can correct yourself sooner.

Pay more than the minimum

If you simply can’t pay down the balance, at least don’t pay only the minimum. The more you pay each month, the faster you’ll pay down the debt, but also you’ll pay less in interest.

Ask for a lower rate

One little-known way to lower your interest is to simply ask for a lower rate. If you are assigned a higher rate on the card’s range, don’t be shy about asking for a lower rate. We found that 56% of consumers who asked were granted a lower interest rate.

Watch out for deferred interest

Sometimes you’ll see the opportunity to pay over time at, say, a furniture store or a jewelry store and defer interest. Be careful, because that means you are accruing interest from the beginning, and you may have to pay that interest if you don’t pay the balance before the offer ends. By comparison, 0% intro offers on credit cards don’t charge interest during the offer period, although interest does kick on any remaining balance once the offer ends.

Pros and cons of 0% intro APR credit cards

Having a credit card with a no interest offer not only helps you save money. It can be good for consolidation, non-card debt, emergencies, and sometimes, rewards. But there are, as with everything, downsides as well.

Pros Cons
Save money on interest Temptation to incur more debt
Can offer rewards May have to choose between rewards and lengthy term
Typically no annual fee Typically requires good or excellent credit
Good for major purchases, consolidation, balance transfers May be a poor choice for non-card debt, emergencies

What is the average interest rate on a credit card? What is good?

The national average APR has been hovering just above 17%. The average rate among low interest credit cards is currently under 14.10%. Usually, your credit cards’ interest rates are variable and depend on the Federal Reserve’s rates as well as your payment habits. In the case of 0% APR cards, the lower rate on the scale is sometimes below the national average.

Credit card issuers don’t just charge high rates because they want to gouge the consumer – they face significant risk when they issue a credit card.

Why? Because they are committing to lending you money, just as when a bank grants you a mortgage or car loan. However, cards differ because they are what is called an unsecured product, while a loan to buy a car or house is secured. That means that with a card, there is no collateral, or an asset the lender can recover if you don’t pay them their money back.

Also, unlike a lending product such as some student loans in which the federal government may back the loan, no one is backing the loan you are taking out with a credit card every time you make a charge.


† All information about The Amex EveryDay® Credit Card from American Express has been collected independently by CreditCards.com and has not been reviewed by the issuer. The Amex EveryDay® Credit Card from American Express is no longer available through CreditCards.com.


Laura Mohammad is an editor and writer at CreditCards.com. She regularly covers the best credit cards and works to bring you the most up-to-date analysis and advice. You can reach Laura at laura.mohammad@creditcards.com.


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