Low Interest Credit Cards

A low interest credit card makes large balances a little more manageable. If you carry a balance from one month to another, a low APR credit card could be a good choice for you. Browse the best low interest offers from our partners and compare introductory rates, ongoing rates, annual fees, and rewards to find the right card for you.

A low interest credit card makes large balances a little more manageable. If you carry a balance from one month to another, a low APR credit card could be a good choice for you. Browse the best low interest offers from our partners and compare introductory rates, ongoing rates, annual fees, and rewards to find the right card for you.

Editor: Laura Mohammad | Writer: Garrett Yarbrough

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October 1, 2020

Best low interest credit cards of 2020:

Citi® Diamond Preferred® Card

Excellent

Credit Recommended (740-850)

CreditCards.com credit ranges are a variation of FICO® Score 8, one of many types of credit scores lenders may use when considering your credit card application.
Apply Now

Rewards Rate

This card doesn't offer cash back, miles, or points

At A Glance

Annual Fee
$0
Balance Transfer Intro APR
0% for 18 months on Balance Transfers
Regular APR
14.74% - 24.74% variable
Discover it® Miles

Good to Excellent

Credit Recommended (670-850)

CreditCards.com credit ranges are a variation of FICO® Score 8, one of many types of credit scores lenders may use when considering your credit card application.
Apply Now

Rewards Rate

1.5X
Earn unlimited 1.5x Miles for every dollar spent on all purchases - with no annual fee.

At A Glance

Annual Fee
$0
Balance Transfer Intro APR
10.99% for 14 months
Regular APR
11.99% - 22.99% variable
Discover it® Cash Back

Good to Excellent

Credit Recommended (670-850)

CreditCards.com credit ranges are a variation of FICO® Score 8, one of many types of credit scores lenders may use when considering your credit card application.
Apply Now

Rewards Rate

5%
Earn 5% cash back on everyday purchases at different places each quarter like Amazon.com, grocery stores, restaurants, gas stations and when you pay using PayPal, up to the quarterly maximum when you activate.
1%
Earn 1% unlimited cash back on all other purchases – automatically.

At A Glance

Annual Fee
$0
Balance Transfer Intro APR
0% for 14 months
Regular APR
11.99% - 22.99% variable
Citi Rewards+℠ Card

Excellent

Credit Recommended (740-850)

CreditCards.com credit ranges are a variation of FICO® Score 8, one of many types of credit scores lenders may use when considering your credit card application.
Apply Now

Rewards Rate

2X
Earn 2X ThankYou® Points at Supermarkets and Gas Stations for the first $6,000 per year and then 1X Points thereafter.
1X
Earn 1X ThankYou® Points on All Other Purchases.

At A Glance

Annual Fee
$0
Balance Transfer Intro APR
0% intro for 15 months on Balance Transfers
Regular APR
13.49% - 23.49% (Variable)
Blue Cash Everyday® Card from American Express

New Welcome Offer

See Rates & Fees, Terms Apply

Good to Excellent

Credit Recommended (670-850)

CreditCards.com credit ranges are a variation of FICO® Score 8, one of many types of credit scores lenders may use when considering your credit card application.
Apply Now

Rewards Rate

3%
3% Cash Back at U.S. supermarkets (on up to $6,000 per year in purchases, then 1%).
2%
2% Cash Back at U.S. gas stations and at select U.S. department stores.
1%
1% Cash Back on other purchases.

At A Glance

Annual Fee
$0
Balance Transfer Intro APR
N/A
Regular APR
13.99% - 23.99% variable
American Express Cash Magnet® Card
See Rates & Fees, Terms Apply

Good to Excellent

Credit Recommended (670-850)

CreditCards.com credit ranges are a variation of FICO® Score 8, one of many types of credit scores lenders may use when considering your credit card application.
Apply Now

Rewards Rate

1.5%
Unlimited 1.5% Cash Back on your purchases.

At A Glance

Annual Fee
$0
Balance Transfer Intro APR
N/A
Regular APR
13.99% - 23.99% variable
Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express

New Welcome Offer

See Rates & Fees, Terms Apply

Good to Excellent

Credit Recommended (670-850)

CreditCards.com credit ranges are a variation of FICO® Score 8, one of many types of credit scores lenders may use when considering your credit card application.
Apply Now

Rewards Rate

6%
6% Cash Back at U.S. supermarkets on up to $6,000 per year in purchases (then 1%)
6%
6% Cash Back on select U.S. streaming subscriptions
3%
3% Cash Back on transit including taxis/rideshare, parking, tolls, trains, buses and more
3%
3% Cash Back at U.S. gas stations
1%
1% Cash Back on other purchases

At A Glance

Annual Fee
$95, waived first year
Balance Transfer Intro APR
N/A
Regular APR
13.99% - 23.99% variable
Upgrade Card

Fair to Good

Credit Recommended (580-740)

CreditCards.com credit ranges are a variation of FICO® Score 8, one of many types of credit scores lenders may use when considering your credit card application.
Apply Now

Rewards Rate

This card doesn't offer cash back, miles, or points

At A Glance

Annual Fee
$0
Balance Transfer Intro APR
N/A
Regular APR
6.99% - 29.99%
ABOC Platinum Rewards Mastercard®

Excellent

Credit Recommended (740-850)

CreditCards.com credit ranges are a variation of FICO® Score 8, one of many types of credit scores lenders may use when considering your credit card application.
Apply Now

Rewards Rate

5X
Earn 5x rewards on up to $1,500 in combined purchases each quarter in popular categories such as dining, groceries, travel, and automotive
1X
Earn Points on Every Purchase! It’s simple: $1 = 1 Point

At A Glance

Annual Fee
$0
Balance Transfer Intro APR
N/A
Regular APR
12.90% - 22.90% variable

Editorial disclosure: All reviews are prepared by CreditCards.com staff. Opinions expressed therein are solely those of the reviewer and have not been reviewed or approved by any advertiser. The information, including card rates and fees, presented in the review is accurate as of the date of the review. Check the data at the top of this page and the bank's website for the most current information.

All information about Bank of America credit cards, the Wells Fargo Propel American Express® card, Wells Fargo Cash Wise Visa® card, Wells Fargo Platinum card, The Amex EveryDay® Credit Card from American Express, Citi Simplicity® Card and the BankAmericard® credit card have been collected independently by CreditCards.com and has not been reviewed by the issuer.


Comparing Low Interest Credit Card Offers

Although it’s usually best to pay off the balance each month, sometimes that isn’t possible. That’s where low interest cards come in. If you want to look at how interest rates work on credit cards, look no further. We crunched the numbers on more than 800 credit cards to determine the best credit cards with low interest rates, and also included information on how to best utilize these cards. Whether you want to understand the mechanics of our best low interest cards or the difference between interest and APR, we can help. Here, we look at:

Wondering if you qualify? Want to understand how your score affects your interest rates? We look at that and more.


Best Low Interest Credit Cards

best low interest credit cards of 2020

Discover it® Cash Back

Why this card is the best credit card for low interest

The Discover it Cash Back, like several other Discover cards, offers a super-low regular interest rate of 11.99%-22.99% variable APR, ideal for the occasional balance.

Pros

The ongoing rewards and the first-year bonus feature are unsurpassed: 5% cash back on rotating quarterly categories (up to $1,500 in quarterly purchases in various categories upon activation, then 1%) and Discover will match all the cash back you earn at the end of your first year. Add to that, there is no annual fee.

Cons

There’s no sign-up bonus on this card, and the purchase and travel benefits are nonexistent.

Blue Cash Everyday® Card from American Express

Why this card is the best low interest credit card for 0% intro APR

The Blue Cash Everyday offers 0% intro APR for 15 months on purchases. It’s 13.99%-23.99% variable after that.

Pros

The ongoing rewards on this card are strong for a cash back card with no annual fee, and the regular variable APR starts out low at 13.99%-23.99%.

Cons

The welcome offer on the Blue Cash Everyday can be beaten by some competitors, and its tiered ongoing rewards might make you hesitate if you don’t want to think about which card to pull out for specific purchases.

American Express Cash Magnet® Card

Why this card is the best low interest credit card for no annual fee

With its rewards, low introductory interest offer on purchases, as well as a low regular low interest offer, it’s rather remarkable that the Cash Magnet has no annual fee.

Pros

Like the Blue Cash Everyday, the regular variable APR starts out low at 13.99%-23.99%. Also, the 1.5% back on purchases is quite convenient.

Cons

If you want to maximize your rewards depending on the purchase, another card may be a better choice due to this card’s flat rate offer.

Wells Fargo Cash Wise Visa® card

Why this card is the best low interest credit card for digital wallet purchases

In addition to the Cash Wise’s flat rewards rate, you can earn 1.8% cash rewards on qualified digital wallet purchases, like Apple Pay® or Google Pay™, during the first 12 months from opening your account.

Pros

This card is competitive in all sorts of ways, from the sign-up bonus to the ongoing rewards to the 0% intro offer on both purchases and qualifying balance transfers for 15 months (then 14.49% – 24.99% variable).

Cons

The balance transfer fee heads into the upper range of 5% (with a minimum of $5) if you make the transfer after 120 days from opening your account. It’s 3% or $5, whichever is greater, up to 120 days. Also, there’s a foreign transaction fee of 3%.

Wells Fargo Propel American Express® card

Why this card is the best low interest credit card for sign-up bonus

The Propel offers 20,000 points after a $1,000 spend within the first 3 months of card membership, a solid offer for a low interest card with no annual fee.

Pros

Along with its solid 3X rewards rate on dining, travel and select streaming services, this no annual fee card offers a 0% intro APR on both new purchases and qualifying balance transfers for the first 12 months (14.49%-24.99% variable after that).

Cons

If you are really looking for a balance transfer or purchase offer with a long intro APR, this might not be the card for you.

Citi® Double Cash Card

Why this card is the best low interest credit card for cash back

The Double Cash’s ongoing rewards of 1% cash back when you spend, then another 1% when you pay for the purchase make it top-of-line among flat-rate cash back cards.

Pros

This card possesses one of the longest BT intro APR offers, with 0% for 18 months, then 13.99%-23.99% variable after that. This means balance transfers at 0% can be carried into 2022.

Cons

As superior as the Citi Double Cash’s rewards are, its lack of a 0% intro APR on purchases may give you pause. Also, there’s no sign-up bonus.

Wells Fargo Platinum card

Why this card is the best low interest credit card for good credit

The card comes with a suite of tools that should help you manage your finances and protect the good credit you’ve worked so hard to achieve. You get access to My Money Map, which you can use to track your expenses, create a personalized budget, set monthly spending goals and monitor your progress toward your savings goals.

Pros

You can take advantage of a 0% introductory APR on both qualifying balance transfers and new purchases for the first 18 months (16.49%-24.49% variable APR after that). That’s more than a year to chip away at debt or pay down new expenses. The card also stands out for its included cellphone insurance: As long as you pay your phone bill with the card, you can be reimbursed up to $600 per claim should your cellphone be damaged or stolen. You’ll only have to pay a $25 deductible.

Cons

The card offers no rewards program. Additionally, Wells Fargo customer service has failed to impress as of late, ranking ninth out of 11 credit card issuers in J.D. Power’s 2019 customer satisfaction survey.

Citi® Diamond Preferred® Card

Why this card is the best low interest credit card for balance transfers

It offers one of the longest promotional APR periods on balance transfers currently available: You’ll get a whopping 18 months to tackle your transferred balance without paying interest (the card’s APR is 14.74%-24.74% variable after that). Plus, the card’s low-end ongoing APR is lower than the average credit card APR.

Pros

In addition to a long intro APR period on balance transfers, the card offers a solid introductory rate on new purchases: The APR is 0% for the first 18 months and 14.74%-24.74% variable thereafter. Having the option to pay off new purchases over time without drowning in interest could come in handy if you need to cover unexpected expenses.

Cons

The card charges a balance transfer fee of 3% (or $5, whichever is higher). As our Diamond Preferred card review breaks down, you can save a significant amount if you opt instead for a balance transfer card that charges no balance transfer fee at all.

Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express

It’s tough to beat the phenomenal rewards rates on everyday, practical purchases: 6% cash back at U.S. supermarkets (up to $6,000 in purchases per year, then 1%), 6% on select U.S. streaming subscriptions, and 3% at U.S. gas stations and transit. Then, 1% back on general purchases.

Pros

The low end of the 13.99%-23.99% variable APR is quite low, which you may be able to secure if you have excellent credit. Before the interest rate kicks in, you’ll have 12 months of 0% interest on purchases.

Cons

Compared to other low interest cards, 12 months isn’t a competitive introductory period length.

BankAmericard® credit card

Why this card is the best low interest credit card for no penalty APR

Many credit cards will jack up your APR if you fail to pay your bill on time, often to a rate as high as 29.99%. While you should always do your best to pay on time, you won’t have to worry about a penalty APR with the BankAmericard – your ongoing APR isn’t impacted by late payments.

Pros

The card comes with a solid introductory APR period on balance transfers: Take advantage of a 0% intro APR for the first 18 billing cycles on balance transfers made in the first 60 days, after which the APR is 14.49%-24.49% (variable).

Cons

If you’re planning to transfer a balance and aren’t sure whether you’ll be able to pay it off in full before the promotional period ends, you may be better off with a card that carries a lower ongoing APR.

Compare the best low APR credit cards of 2020

Credit CardBest For:0% Intro Purchase APR PeriodRegular APRCreditCards.com Rating
Discover it® Cash BackLow interest14 months11.99% – 22.99% (Variable)3.7 / 5
Blue Cash Everyday® Card from American Express0% intro APR15 months13.99% – 23.99% (Variable)3.6 / 5
American Express Cash Magnet® CardNo annual fee15 months13.99% – 23.99% (Variable)4 / 5
Wells Fargo Cash Wise Visa® cardDigital wallet purchases15 months14.49% – 24.99% (Variable)2.8 / 5
Wells Fargo Propel American Express® cardSign-up bonus12 months14.49% – 24.99% (Variable)3.5 / 5
Citi® Double Cash CardCash backN/A13.99% – 23.99% (Variable)1.4 / 5
Wells Fargo Platinum cardGood credit18 months16.49% – 24.49%(Variable)4.4 / 5
Citi® Diamond Preferred® CardBalance transfers18 months14.74% – 24.74%(Variable)3.9 / 5
Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American ExpressU.S. supermarkets12 months13.99 – 23.99% (variable)3.2 / 5
BankAmericard® credit cardNo penalty APR18 billing cycles14.49% – 24.49% (Variable)3.6 / 5

Research methodology: How we chose the best low interest credit cards:

It’s no surprise that when deciding the best low interest credit cards, we chose cards with low APRs. We also took the length of the introductory period into account, since a longer 0% APR period may reduce the total amount of interest accrued on a large purchase.

Number of low interest cards we analyzed: 869

Criteria used: Regular APR, intro APR, other rates and fees, rewards rates, rewards categories, redemption options, miscellaneous features and benefits, customer service, security, credit needed, ease of application

What is a low interest credit card?

Low interest credit cards can be cards with intro offers for purchases and balance transfers, usually at 0%, or they can be simply a card with a low regular interest rate, as in the case of some of the Discover cards. Here, we answer your most common questions about interest rates and credit cards.

What is the average interest rate on a credit card?

Typically, a low interest rate is considered a figure that is below the national average. Currently, the national average interest rate for credit cards is 16.03%. This is one of the lowest interest rates in nearly two years due to our current economic slowdown. When the Federal Reserve dropped interest rates in March 2020, many lenders cut interest rates on new credit cards. This sudden rate change could be beneficial to those who have an outstanding credit card balance (but you may need to ask for a lower rate) or are interested in a card with a lower interest rate.

Average credit card interest rates

What is credit card interest?

Credit card interest is the amount that you are charged when you don’t pay your credit card balance in full at the end of each month. Your interest rate will be stated as an APR, or “annual percentage rate.” This is the yearly cost of borrowing money, and consists of your interest, fees, and other charges represented as a percentage amount. The amount that you pay in interest each month can vary based on things like creditworthiness and the type of credit account that you have; however, if you pay off your balance in full, you won’t be charged interest. If you don’t pay off your balance each month, the interest rate you pay can be one of the most important features of a credit card.

What is considered a low interest rate?

According to CreditCards.com’s weekly rates survey, the low interest average is currently at 12.83%.

How does your credit score affect your interest rate?

Card issuers look to your credit score to determine how risky it is to lend to you. Since your credit score is primarily derived from your payment history and your balance-to-available-credit ratio, it’s a good predictor of credit behavior.
If your credit score is low, it signals that you’re less likely to pay back the money you borrow. To make up for the risk of a borrower not repaying debt, issuers charge higher interest rates to those who pose the most risk. You can think of interest rates as a safety net for issuers. Read our full article for more information about how credit scores affect interest rates.

Which kind of cardholder are you?

The level of consideration you give to a credit card’s interest rate depends on the way you will be using the card. The American Bankers Association’s Q4 2019 Credit Card Industry Monitor divides cardholders into 3 types: transactors, revolvers and dormants. Transactors usually pay their balance in full each billing cycle, while revolvers tend to carry a balance from month to month. Dormants, who make up nearly a quarter of accounts, don’t use their credit card at all.

Since you won’t accumulate any interest by paying your balance in full each month or not using your card at all, having a credit card with low interest is only important for revolvers, who make up the largest segment of cardholders.

How does credit card interest work?

You probably know that if you carry a balance on your credit card, at some point you will pay interest. Here, we explain how that works.

Your interest is expressed in APR, or annual percentage rate. According to Discover, you divide that rate by 365 (days of the year) to calculate your daily rate. So, if your card has an APR of 15%, it will have a daily rate of .041096%. So, with a balance of $1,000 at 15%, you add the interest, and the new balance the next day is $1,000.41. This continues, with compounding, until the end of the month when your balance is $1,013.

You might get a grace period of roughly a month to pay your bill off and avoid interest, and of course you can take out a 0% intro APR card as well to avoid paying interest. But the bottom line is that if you don’t pay off your balance, you can eventually get slammed with interest, and your monthly charges can drag on for years if you only pay the minimum.

To calculate interest on a credit card, use our handy-dandy interest calculators.They allow you to figure out how long it will take you to pay off a balance with the minimum payment, how much you are paying in interest each month, how much you can save by speeding up the payment process and more.

Types of APRs

Here are the typical APRs charged by card issuers:

  • APR for purchases. The most common APR, this rate is applied when you carry a balance. Some cards, such as The Amex EveryDay® Credit Card from American Express, offer a 0% intro purchase offer for a set time. In the case of the EveryDay, the balance is charged the go-to variable rate of 12.99%-23.99% after 15 months.
  • APR for balance transfers. Similar to the purchase APR, balance transfer cards will usually offer a 0% intro APR for a set amount of time, then revert to the go-to rate.
  • Cash advance APR. This rate usually kicks in immediately after you take out the cash.
  • Penalty APR. This is typically a considerably higher interest rate that’s triggered when you violate issuer terms – usually for late monthly payments. After 6 consecutive on-time payments, the issuer may lower your rate again. Some cards, like Discover products, don’t carry this type of APR.

Why are credit card interest rates so high?

Even with an excellent credit score, the current average low-interest credit card APR clocks in at 12.83% – over double the 5.99% you commonly see for personal loan APRs. So why are credit card interest rates that much higher with the same financial records?
Why loans have lower rates than credit cards can be chalked up to cards’ higher cost to lenders due to risk, regulations, and the economy.
Higher credit card interest rates largely account for the cost to banks if you can’t repay them or a fraudster strikes. Since credit cards don’t typically require collateral like loans do – and regulations protect cardholders from certain fees, rate increases, and the bulk of fraudulent charges – lenders have to make up a bigger loss for cards than loans.
Want to learn more? Click here to learn more about credit card APRs.

What is the difference between low interest and zero interest credit cards?

Although both types of credit cards can save you money on interest payments, the biggest difference boils down to how the card reduces interest. Low interest credit cards generally focus on providing a lower ongoing APR while zero interest cards don’t charge interest for a set period. Zero interest cards do this with introductory 0% APR periods on purchases and/or balance transfers that can last up to 18 months. Unfortunately, the 0% rate won’t last forever, and you’ll begin accruing interest after that timeframe. Just keep in mind that you’ll probably need a good to excellent credit score in order to qualify for the best low interest and 0% APR offers.
To decide which card is your best option, consider why you want to avoid interest.

  • Zero interest cards are great for buying time to pay off a large sum without interest slowing you down. You’ll want to look into a card with a 0% intro purchase APR if you have a big purchase coming up, or one with a 0% intro balance transfer APR if you’re moving debt to another card.
    Zero interest cards are also fantastic for lowering your balance quickly and boosting your credit score. Since your credit score benefits from having a low balance and high credit limit – a factor called your credit utilization ratio – zero interest periods mean paying more toward your balance instead of interest. For this reason, lowering your balance sooner means improving your credit score sooner.
  • Low interest cards may provide better long-term value if you’d save more money on interest with a consistently lower ongoing APR rather than a temporary 0% period.
    Compared to zero interest balance transfer cards, low interest cards might also be a better fit if you’re looking for ongoing rewards and sign-up bonuses. For instance, Citi® Diamond Preferred® and the Citi Simplicity® Card are cards designed around some of the longest zero interest periods currently available (both with an 18-month 0% intro purchase and balance transfer APR, 14.74%-24.74% variable ongoing), but they don’t offer much value outside the 0% APR terms without rewards or a sign-up bonus. Meanwhile, cards like the Discover it® Cash Back offer lower ongoing interest (11.99%-22.99% variable ongoing), cash back and a new cardmember bonus in exchange for a more moderate 0% intro APR length (14-month 0% intro purchase and balance transfer APR). Plus, they’re more accessible since the Citi cards require an “excellent” credit score.

How to choose the best low interest credit card for you

Factors to consider

  • What is your credit score? – Our top low interest cards require good or excellent credit, and it’s important to apply for a card that matches your credit. If you don’t have good credit, a low interest card is probably not a good option.
  • How does the regular APR compare to other cards? – If you plan to carry a balance month to month, note the regular APR. Some, such as the Discover it Cash Back, start with a super low APR – in the case of the Discover card, it’s 11.99%-22.99% variable.
  • Are you interested in rewards? – Most of our top low interest credit cards offer travel or cash back rewards.
  • What is the annual fee? – The bulk of our low interest cards offer no annual fee, but some, such as the Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express, have an annual fee that may actually be worth your while because of the rewards offered.
  • Are you planning a big purchase? – Low interest credit cards might offer a 0% intro APR on balance transfers, purchases or both. Some, such as the Citi Diamond Preferred, offer extended 0% intro APR on both. In the case of the Diamond Preferred, it’s 18 months for purchases and for balance transfers made within the first 4 months of opening your account (it’s 14.74%-24.74% variable after that).

Comparing two low interest card offers

Here we look at a side-by-side comparison of two low interest cards with the features listed above. As you can see, the cards’ APR rates and annual fees are comparable:

Card:Discover it Cash Back
Discover it Balance Transfer card
American Express Cash Magnet® Card
American Express Cash Magnet Card
Credit Recommended:Good – ExcellentGood – Excellent
0% intro APR period – Purchases:14 months15 months
0% intro APR – Balance transfer:14 monthsN/A
Regular APR:11.99%-22.99% (Variable)13.99%-23.99% (Variable)
Annual fee:$0$0
Rewards rate:5% on rotating categories each quarter*1.5% unlimited cash back on purchases

*On up to $1,500 in combined purchases each quarter after enrollment, then 1%

How to save money with a low interest credit card

A high interest rate is one of the biggest culprits in attaining card debt. If you owe $3,000 and you are paying a rate of 16.5% APR, then it would take you 124 months to pay the minimum amount, and you would end up paying $2,122 in interest alone.

Card debt rose by $46 billion in the fourth quarter of 2019 when compared to the previous period, according to the New York Fed, while seriously delinquent credit card accounts (more than 90 days past due) leveled off to 4.7% in 2019.

How can I avoid paying interest on a credit card?

To avoid that debt, the best thing you can do is to pay in full each month. Also, avoid putting charges on your card that you can’t pay in full by the due date. Want that big-screen TV but don’t have the cash? Start setting aside the money rather than paying with your card without a plan.

If you’re already stuck in debt, you can avoid paying some interest by paying more than the minimum amount. Remember that $3,000 at a 16.5% rate, in which you end up with more than $2,000 in interest charges because you paid the minimum? Well, if you paid $200 a month, those interest charges would drop to $383.

If you pay more than the minimum…

RateMonthly paymentMonths to pay offAmount owedInterest to pay off
16.5%3% or $25, whichever is greater124$3,000$2,122
16.5%$20017$3,000$383

Another way to save money on interest is to transfer an existing balance to a balance transfer card or a low interest card.

With a lower interest rate, and even better, 0% intro APR, you can pay off that card debt at a faster rate. Also, you save hundreds of dollars in interest charges.

Can you ask for a lower credit card interest rate?

The most direct way to lower your interest rate on your credit card is to simply ask. We found in a 2018 survey that 56% of consumers who asked for a lower interest rate got it. And it’s important to stay mindful of what your interest rate is, although another of our polls found that one-third of cardholders with a balance didn’t know their interest rate.

Why you should avoid keeping a balance on your credit card

In addition to interest incurred when carrying a balance, there’s another reason why you should avoid card debt. The second most important factor of your credit score is your credit utilization ratio, or how much you owe on your cards compared to how much credit you have available. So, if you owe $500 and you have $5,000 in available credit, then your utilization ratio is 10%, which is a good ratio.

Figuring out your credit utilization ratio

CardCredit availableAmount owedCredit utilization ratio
Citi® Double Cash Card$2,000$200$200/$2,000=10%
American Express Cash Magnet® Card$2,000$300$300/$2,000=15%
Discover it Cash Back$1,000$0$0/$1,000=0%
TOTAL$5,000$500$500/$5,000=10%

As you can see, there is a ratio for each card and a total ratio for all cards combined. Both matter. The industry standard is to keep the ratios under 30%, but it’s best to keep them as close to 0% as possible, partly to avoid paying interest and partly to keep your credit healthy.

Additional Resources

With our picks for the best low interest credit cards on this page, we cover a unique selection of credit cards with low regular interest rates. We have also curated and compiled a list of the best credit cards with long 0% APR offers and for balance transfers specifically — check them out:

You can read some individual reviews for low interest credit cards at our reviews section. You can use these to get a better idea of how products compare to one another and decide which offer is the best for your needs.