Airline Credit Cards

If you're a frequent flyer, get a card that rewards you for spending on flights! Airline credit cards offer generous rewards and perks like free checked bags or airport lounge access with specific airlines. We analyzed 148 airline credit cards to find you the best recommendations - these are the 10 best airline credit card offers from our partners that will have you racking up miles in no time. If you're looking for general travel rewards, check out our travel credit cards.

See the best airline credit card offers from our partners below. If you're looking for general travel rewards, check out our travel credit cards.

Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card

7,668 customer reviews

Apply Now Credit Needed
Excellent/Good
  • Earn 50,000 bonus points after you spend $4,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening. That's $625 toward travel when you redeem through Chase Ultimate Rewards®
  • Chase Sapphire Preferred® named a 'Best Travel Credit Card' by MONEY® Magazine, 2016-2017
  • 2X points on travel and dining at restaurants worldwide & 1 point per dollar spent on all other purchases.
  • Earn 5,000 bonus points after you add the first authorized user and make a purchase in the first 3 months from account opening
  • No foreign transaction fees
  • 1:1 point transfer to leading airline and hotel loyalty programs
  • Get 25% more value when you redeem for travel through Chase Ultimate Rewards. For example, 50,000 points are worth $625 toward travel.
  • No blackout dates or travel restrictions - as long as there's a seat on the flight, you can book it through Chase Ultimate Rewards
Apply Now at Chase's
secure site
Purchases Intro APR
N/A
Balance Transfers Intro APR
N/A
Regular APR
17.49% - 24.49% Variable
Annual Fee
$0 Intro for the First Year, then $95
Credit Needed
Excellent/Good

Citi® / AAdvantage® Platinum Select® World Elite™ Mastercard®

Apply Now Credit Needed
Excellent/Good
  • For a limited time, earn 60,000 American Airlines AAdvantage® bonus miles after making $3,000 in purchases within the first 3 months of account opening*
  • New: Earn 2 AAdvantage® miles for every $1 spent at gas stations*
  • New: Earn 2 AAdvantage® miles for every $1 spent at restaurants*
  • Earn 2 AAdvantage® miles for every $1 spent on eligible American Airlines purchases*
  • New: Earn a $100 American Airlines Flight Discount after you spend $20,000 or more in purchases during your cardmembership year and renew your card*
  • No Foreign Transaction Fees*
  • First checked bag is free on domestic American Airlines itineraries for you and up to four companions traveling with you on the same reservation*
  • Enjoy preferred boarding on American Airlines flights*
  • Receive 25% savings on in-flight food and beverage purchases when you use your card on American Airlines flights*
Apply Now at Citi's
secure site
Purchases Intro APR
N/A
Balance Transfers Intro APR
N/A
Regular APR
17.49% - 25.49%* (Variable)
Annual Fee
$99, waived for first 12 months*
Credit Needed
Excellent/Good

Gold Delta SkyMiles® Credit Card from American Express

Apply Now Credit Needed
Excellent/Good
  • Earn 30,000 Bonus Miles after spending $1,000 in purchases in the first 3 months and a $50 statement credit after making a Delta purchase in the first 3 months with your new Card.
  • Earn 2 miles for every dollar spent on eligible purchases made directly with Delta. Earn 1 mile for every eligible dollar spent on purchases.
  • Check your first bag free on Delta flights - that's a savings of up to $200 per round trip for a family of four.
  • Settle into your seat sooner with Priority Boarding.
  • Enjoy a $0 introductory annual fee for the first year, then $95.
  • Terms Apply.
Apply Now at American Express's
secure site
Terms Apply
Purchases Intro APR
N/A
Balance Transfers Intro APR
N/A
Regular APR
17.24%-26.24% Variable
Annual Fee
$0 introductory annual fee for the first year, then $95.
Credit Needed
Excellent/Good
See Rates & Fees

Southwest Rapid Rewards® Plus Credit Card

Southwest Rapid Rewards® Plus Credit Card

1,449 customer reviews

Apply Now Credit Needed
Excellent Credit
  • Earn 40,000 points after you spend $1,000 on purchases in the first 3 months your account is open.
  • 3,000 bonus points after your Cardmember anniversary
  • 2 points per $1 spent on Southwest® purchases and Rapid Rewards® Hotel and Car Rental Partner purchases
  • 1 point per $1 spent on all other purchases
  • Earn unlimited points that don't expire as long as your card account is open
  • No blackout dates or seat restrictions
  • Bags fly free® and no change fees
  • Redeem your points for flights, hotel stays, gift cards, access to events and more
Apply Now at Chase's
secure site
Purchases Intro APR
N/A
Balance Transfers Intro APR
N/A
Regular APR
17.49% - 24.49% Variable
Annual Fee
$69
Credit Needed
Excellent Credit

Southwest Rapid Rewards® Premier Credit Card

Southwest Rapid Rewards® Premier Credit Card

2,133 customer reviews

Apply Now Credit Needed
Excellent Credit
  • Earn 40,000 points after you spend $1,000 on purchases in the first 3 months your account is open.
  • 6,000 bonus points after your Cardmember anniversary
  • 2 points per $1 spent on Southwest® purchases and Rapid Rewards® Hotel and Car Rental Partner purchases
  • 1 point per $1 spent on all other purchases
  • Earn unlimited points that don't expire as long as your card account is open
  • No foreign transaction fees
  • No blackout dates or seat restrictions, Bags fly free® and no change fees
  • Redeem your points for flights, hotel stays, gift cards, access to events and more
Apply Now at Chase's
secure site
Purchases Intro APR
N/A
Balance Transfers Intro APR
N/A
Regular APR
17.49% - 24.49% Variable
Annual Fee
$99
Credit Needed
Excellent Credit

United MileagePlus® Explorer Card

Apply Now Credit Needed
Excellent Credit
  • 40,000 bonus miles after you spend $2,000 on purchases in the first 3 months your account is open
  • $0 introductory annual fee for the first year, then $95.
  • Check your first bag for free (a savings of up to $100 per roundtrip) when you use your Card to purchase your ticket
  • Enjoy priority boarding privileges and visit the United Club℠ with 2 one-time passes each year for your anniversary
  • No foreign transaction fees
  • Earn 2 miles per $1 spent on tickets purchased from United, and 1 mile per $1 spent on all other purchases
  • Your miles don't expire as long as your credit card account is open, with no limit to the number of miles you can earn
Apply Now at Chase's
secure site
Purchases Intro APR
N/A
Balance Transfers Intro APR
N/A
Regular APR
17.49% - 24.49% Variable
Annual Fee
$0 Intro for First Year, then $95
Credit Needed
Excellent Credit

Blue Delta SkyMiles® Credit Card from American Express

Apply Now Credit Needed
Excellent Credit
  • Earn 10,000 bonus miles after spending $500 in purchases on your new Card in your first 3 months.
  • No Annual Fee.
  • Earn 2 miles per dollar at US restaurants.
  • Earn 2 miles per dollar spent on purchases made directly with Delta. Earn 1 mile on every eligible dollar spent on purchases.
  • Receive a 20% In-Flight Savings in the form of a statement credit after you use your Card on eligible Delta in-flight purchases of food, beverages, and audio headsets.
  • Terms Apply.
Apply Now at American Express's
secure site
Terms Apply
Purchases Intro APR
N/A
Balance Transfers Intro APR
N/A
Regular APR
17.24%-26.24% Variable
Annual Fee
$0
Credit Needed
Excellent Credit
See Rates & Fees

Alaska Airlines Visa Signature® Credit Card

Apply Now Credit Needed
Excellent/Good
  • Special Introductory Offer: Buy 1 ticket, get 1 for just the taxes and fees with Alaska's Famous Companion Fare™ Offer.
  • Get 30,000 bonus miles after you make $1,000 or more in purchases within the first 90 days of your account opening.
  • Enjoy another Alaska's Famous Companion Fare™ every year from $121 ($99 plus taxes and fees from $22) on your account anniversary valid on Alaska and Virgin America flights booked on alaskaair.com.
  • Save with a free checked bag on Alaska and Virgin America flights for you and up to six other passengers on the same reservation.
  • Earn 3 miles for every $1 spent directly on Alaska Airlines and Virgin America purchases and 1 mile for every $1 spent on all other purchases. No foreign transaction fees.
  • There are two types of cards: the Visa Signature® card and the Platinum Plus® card. The card you receive will be determined by several factors including your income and credit history.
  • The benefits and bonus miles above apply to Visa Signature cards only. The Annual Fees, benefits and bonus miles for Platinum Plus® cards are different.
  • For more information on the differences, see the Features section accompanying the application.
Apply Now at Bank of America's
secure site
Purchases Intro APR
N/A
Balance Transfers Intro APR
N/A
Regular APR
16.49% - 24.49% Variable APR on purchases and balance transfers
Annual Fee
$75
Credit Needed
Excellent/Good

Citi® / AAdvantage® Executive World Elite™ Mastercard®

Apply Now Credit Needed
Excellent Credit
  • Earn 50,000 American Airlines AAdvantage® bonus miles after spending $5,000 in purchases within the first 3 months of account opening*
  • Admirals Club® membership for you and guests with you*
  • Complimentary Admirals Club® lounge access for authorized users
  • Earn 10,000 AAdvantage® Elite Qualifying Miles (EQMs) after you spend $40,000 in purchases within the year*
  • No Foreign Transaction Fees on purchases*
  • Earn 2 AAdvantage® miles for every $1 spent on eligible American Airlines purchases and 1 AAdvantage® mile for every $1 spent on other purchases*
  • First checked bag is free on domestic American Airlines itineraries for you and up to eight companions traveling with you on the same reservation*
Apply Now at Citi's
secure site
Purchases Intro APR
N/A
Balance Transfers Intro APR
N/A
Regular APR
17.24% - 25.24%* (Variable)
Annual Fee
$450
Credit Needed
Excellent Credit

British Airways Visa Signature® Card

Apply Now Credit Needed
Excellent Credit
  • 50,000 bonus Avios after you spend $3,000 on purchases within the first 3 months from account opening.
  • Earn an additional 25,000 bonus Avios after you spend $10,000 total on purchases within your first year from account opening for a total of 75,000 bonus Avios.
  • Earn a further 25,000 bonus Avios after you spend $20,000 total on purchases within your first year from account opening for a total of 100,000 bonus Avios.
  • Every calendar year you make $30,000 in purchases on your British Airways Visa card, you’ll earn a Travel Together Ticket good for two years.
  • In addition to the bonus Avios, you will also get 3 Avios for every $1 spent on British Airways purchases and 1 Avios for every $1 spent on all other purchases.
  • Pay no foreign transaction fees when you travel abroad.
  • Chip Technology allows you to use your card for chip based purchases in Europe & beyond, while still giving you the ability to use your card as you do today at home.
Apply Now at Chase's
secure site
Purchases Intro APR
N/A
Balance Transfers Intro APR
N/A
Regular APR
17.49% - 24.49% Variable
Annual Fee
$95
Credit Needed
Excellent Credit

Comparing Airline Credit Card Offers

Updated: May 23, 2018

Choosing a credit card can be difficult, and choosing the “right” one for your needs can be even more of a challenge. If you fly often, you’ll want to make sure the card you select helps you maximize your opportunity to earn airline status as you spend money on flights.

We’ve compiled a list of the best airline credit cards for your needs, and this guide will walk you through how to select the right one for your needs.

So, whatever your travel goals, we’ll help you decide if an airline card works best for you.


CreditCards.com's best airline credit cards of 2018 for every major carrier:

After analyzing over 140 airline credit card offers, we've hand selected these 10 best credit cards for airline travel. The Gold Delta SkyMiles card from American Express and the British Airways Visa Signature card top our list because of their generous sign-up bonuses and valuable transfer partners.

Research methodology: how we chose the best cards

Airline credit cards analyzed: 148

Criteria used: Rewards rates, rewards categories, airline alliance partners, other transfer partners, sign-up bonus, point values, redemption options, redemption flexibility, elite status, annual fee, travel credits, airport lounge access, miscellaneous travel benefits, rates and fees, customer service, credit needed, upgrade and downgrade options

Editor's opinion on the best airline credit cards

Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card

Best for: Flexible travel rewards
Airline: All

Though the Chase Sapphire Preferred is not co-branded with any one particular airline, the Ultimate Rewards points you earn by using it can be redeemed for flights with a bevy of airline partners—making it an incredibly valuable tool in scoring travel rewards.

Spend $4,000 on the card in the first three months and you’ll get an extra 50,000 points, which equates to $625 towards travel in Chase’s Ultimate Rewards portal. On top of the sign-up bonus, you’ll earn 2X points on all dining and travel, broadly defined by Chase to include expenses like parking and Uber rides. Considering the 1X points on every other purchase made, it’s reasonable to assume that by the time you get your sign-up bonus, you’ll already have well over 4,000 points.

The CSP is a staple in the world of travel rewards; use it to book flights, hotels, and for picking up the tab at dinner and you’ll never be short of flexible Chase points. For similar cards, you can expect to pay an annual fee of several hundred dollars or more—the Chase Sapphire Preferred is only $95 annually, and that fee is waived the first year.

Bottom Line:  A travel card with sensational point value and ample opportunities to earn them.

Citi® / AAdvantage® Platinum Select World Elite™ Mastercard®

Best for: Large sign-up bonus
Airline: American

If you already fly American, getting the Citi AAdvantage Platinum Select World Elite Mastercard will instantly upgrade your flight experience. Exclusive perks include: a free checked bag for you and up to four companions traveling with you on the same reservation, preferred boarding, and 25% off in-flight food and drinks when purchased with your card on American Airlines flights.

Holding this card won’t just improve your in-flight experience, it will help you save throughout the year, too. Every time you redeem your miles for a flight, you’ll automatically get 10 percent of them back.

Since you’ll collect 60,000 bonus sign-up miles off the jump, you’ll have no problem off-setting the $99 annual fee, which is waived for the first 12 months, with that 10 percent rebate.

Bottom Line: If American is your primary airline, you’ll really enjoy the special perks exclusive to this card.

Gold Delta SkyMiles® Credit Card from American Express

Best for: Easy sign-up bonus
Airline: Delta

Whether or not you already fly Delta, the Gold Delta SkyMiles Credit Card from American Express will elevate your flying experience. Amex perks are arguably the best of any issuer—the partnership with Delta further demonstrates that with the Gold Delta card.

You’ll get priority seating, a free checked bag for you and up to eight companions traveling on the same reservation, purchase protection, discounts on Sky Club passes, and much more. The 30,000-mile welcome bonus after spending just $1,000 in the first three months is a nice added incentive to fliers already a part of the SkyMiles program.

If reaching Delta Medallion status is more important to you than bonus miles, you may want to consider the Platinum Delta SkyMiles Credit Card, which comes with a 5,000 Medallion Qualification Miles welcome bonus (25,000 MQMs are needed to reach the first level of Delta’s Medallion status).

Bottom Line: If you’re Delta-loyal but not ready to pay the $195 annual fee for a Platinum Delta SkyMiles Credit Card, the Gold Card is a worthy substitute at $95 annually (waived the first year).

Southwest Rapid Rewards® Plus Credit Card

Best for: Low cost
Airline: Southwest

Southwest’s rewards points are valuable to its loyal customers, whom are rewarded for getting the Rapid Rewards Plus card with a 40,000-point sign-up bonus (with $1,000 spend on purchases in first 3 months of account ownership). If you’re already a Rapid Rewards member, you know that the Companion Pass is one of the holy grails of airline rewards—a free ticket for a companion every time you redeem points for a flight. You’ll need to rack up 110,000 points to get there, which is achievable with this card’s intro bonus.

Southwest will give you an additional 3,000 bonus points every year on your Cardmember anniversary, providing a little extra incentive to stick around. Beyond that, you’ll earn 2X points on Southwest airfare and 2X points on hotel and rental car bookings through their partners.

If you rarely fly Southwest, it doesn’t make sense to seek out their rewards points, as they’re not transferable to other airlines. Also keep in mind that this card comes with a 3% foreign transaction fee and may not be the best card for international spending.

Bottom Line: Southwest loyalists can make good headway toward Companion Pass privileges pretty quickly by using this card on most travel purchases.

Southwest Rapid Rewards® Premier Credit Card

Best for: Annual bonus
Airline: Southwest

The Southwest Rapid Rewards Premier Credit Card carries all the benefits of its Plus Card counterpart, but with a heftier annual fee and point bonus. You’ll pay $99 every year for the Premier (for Plus, you’ll pay $69), but you’ll also collect 6,000 bonus points after your Cardmember anniversary instead of 3,000.

In addition, there is no foreign transaction fee when using the Premier card. If you’re planning on vacationing abroad and would like to continue growing your sum of Rapid Rewards points, you’re better off going with the Premier, which won’t zap the value from your points with foreign fees.

Expect a similar experience as you would from the Rapid Rewards Plus Credit Card, but with a more ample reward for staying Southwest-loyal every year. As always, bags fly free and you’ll never experience seat restrictions or blackout dates.

Bottom Line: Flying on Southwest internationally with this card is a great way to work your way towards Companion Pass privileges. The annual points bonus is unmatched anywhere.

United MileagePlus® Explorer Card

Best for: Sign-up bonus
Airline: United

United points have good value for airline credit card rewards; the 40,000 bonus miles you’ll earn out of the gate for spending $2,000 in the first three months is a nice prize for being airline-loyal. A hidden value of United’s rewards system is its transferability to a network of 28 partnering airlines.

If you often fly out of one of United’s hubs (currently: Chicago ORD, Houston IAH and Newark EWR, among others), chances are, you won’t necessarily need to transfer your points; but if you live elsewhere, you’ll have no trouble doing so. Like many other airline cards, you’ll earn 2X points for on-brand flight purchases and 1X for everything else. With the United MileagePlus Explorer Card, you’ll also score a free checked bag on flights booked with your Card, and two one-time United Club passes each year for your anniversary.

Perks here are on par with what you can expect from other airline cards—what it really comes down to is where you live and where you’re going. United’s rewards have especially good value when flying to North America, Central America, and the Caribbean.

Bottom Line:  Whether you use a United hub airport or not, you can pull good value from the Explorer Card’s sign-up bonus because of United’s many partnering airlines.

Blue Delta SkyMiles® Credit Card from American Express

Best for: No annual fee
Airline: Delta

If you’re new to airline rewards programs, or you happen to be a fan of flying Delta but don’t want to pay an annual credit card fee, check out the Blue Delta SkyMiles Card from American Express. The 2X miles rate on Delta flights is what you’d expect, but the 2X miles at US restaurants is a nice surprise for an airline card.

Signing up for the card gets you a bonus 10,000 miles that you’ll only have to spend $500 over the course of the first three months to receive. If you haven’t already signed up for Delta’s Skymiles dining program, do so. It’s free and will give you an opportunity to double down on miles when you pay with this card.

Though technically a lower-tier airline rewards card due to its more modest welcome bonus and lighter perk package than the Gold Delta SkyMiles Card, the Blue Card offers plenty of value to new rewards cardholders and frequent Delta fliers alike.

Bottom Line:  Join Delta’s SkyMiles dining program and use this card at US restaurants to quickly build an impressive stockpile of mileage.

Alaska Airlines Visa Signature® Credit Card

Best for: Transfer program
Airline: Alaska

If you live on the West Coast or travel there often from a major US city on the East Coast, you’re probably already aware of Alaska Airlines’ stellar reputation. Regarded as one of the country’s finest airlines, Alaska continues to dole out nice perks with their very own Visa Signature credit card.

Value across the board is better than average. Use the card to book flights on Alaska for 3X miles, enjoy a 30,000-mile sign-up bonus after you spend $1,000 or more in purchases within the first 90 days of account opening, and get a companion ticket for just the taxes and fees as a welcome offer. You’ll pay $75 annually for the card, but the free first checked bag and annual discounted companion ticket offset that completely.

Alaska acquired Virgin America in 2018, creating more opportunities for you to use the card and fly Alaska, especially if you live in California, Oregon, Washington, or Western Canada. This card doesn’t charge foreign transaction fees, either, making it a no-brainer if you often travel between Canada and the US or Mexico.

Bottom Line: Alaska is one of America’s favorite airlines—with its signature credit card, you’ll have no problem pulling big value out of its points and perks.

Citi® / AAdvantage® Executive World Elite™ Mastercard®

Best for: Business travelers
Airline: American

American’s credit card designed for international business travelers and fans of luxury flying, the Executive World Elite Mastercard offers free Admirals Club access for you and up to 10 authorized users, even when they are not traveling with you. As club access would normally cost you $475 or more, this perk is the primary reason for getting the card.

The 50,000 bonus miles are a nice introductory offer, but you’ll need to spend $5,000 in the first three months to get them, which is doable for the international business traveler but may dissuade some others from applying.

American has tons of airline partners, making their rewards system flexible for frequent business travelers. If you fly often for work, you’ll most likely be able to get good use out of this particular card.

Bottom Line: Access to more than 50 Admirals Club locations worldwide makes this card worthwhile for American Airlines travelers.

British Airways Visa Signature® Card

Best for: Avios bonus
Airline: British

The British Airways Visa Signature Card is fantastic for avid travelers, and its varied and generous benefits perfectly mitigate the relatively high annual fee.

You might not like the $95 annual fee, but if you love saving money on travel, the British Airways Visa Signature Card from Chase is worth the price of admission. The annual fee is a small investment, considering what you get out of this product. Such perks include an excellent sign-up bonus and great earnings scheme.

Plus, you get one of the best frequent flyer programs in the world, with a global reach that goes beyond flying on one airline. No matter where you go in the world, Avios – the British Airways Executive Club currency – will help you get airborne even if British Airways doesn’t fly there. Not everything about the British Airways Visa Signature Card – and the airline itself – is peachy, but savvy globetrotters know how to thrive on the “good” and steer clear of the “bad.”

You can use Avios on other airlines around the world, including American Airlines in the U.S. and Canada, Alaska Airlines to fly to Hawaii, LAN Airlines in Latin America; British Airways or Aer Lingus in Europe, Cathay Pacific in Southeast Asia, Japan Airlines in Japan, and Qantas Airways in Australia. If you don’t mind doing some research, you can learn how to redeem Avios wisely. This helps you maximize the benefits and minimize the cost. Redemption begins with just 4,500 Avios, or 7,500 Avios for flights originating or terminating in the U.S.

The British Airways Visa Signature Card earning scheme is above average as well. You earn three points per dollar on British Airways purchases and one point per dollar on everything else. If you frequently buy tickets on British Airways, you will rack up a substantial number of Avios in no time.

Bottom Line: The obvious choice for those who prefer British Airways

What experts are saying

Lisa Gerstner, contributing editor at Kiplinger’s Personal Finance
Favorite airline card: Alaska Airlines Visa Signature card
“With an annual fee of $75, the Alaska Airlines Visa Signature card folds in a host of enticing benefits for flyers at a lower price than similar cards from other airlines, which often charge about $95.”

Johnny Jet, travel expert
Favorite airline card: Alaska Airlines Visa Signature card
“They give you a [discounted] companion ticket each year with no blackout dates. Also, Alaska’s miles are worth more than American’s.”

Holly Johnson, personal finance expert
Favorite airline card: Citi AAdvantage Platinum Select World Elite Mastercard
“While all three cards on the list are strong options for someone trying to rack up airline miles, the Citi AAdvantage card pulls out ahead in terms of value.”

Matt Schulz, senior industry analyst at CreditCards.com
Favorite airline card: Citi AAdvantage Platinum Select World Elite Mastercard
“It's got a strong sign-up bonus, gives you a free checked bag for you and four of your travel companions and also gives you preferred boarding on American flights. That all adds up to a pretty good deal.”

Daniel Ray, Editor-in-Chief at CreditCards.com
Favorite airline card: British Airways Visa Signature card
“There can be a high learning curve with this card. You need to learn its network of partners and how to reduce or avoid the dreaded ‘carrier surcharges,’ but once you do, you’ll be able to sort the program’s money-saving features from its pricey ones.”


What are airline credit cards and how do they work?

First, let’s briefly discuss frequent flyer programs offered by airlines, because the whole point of an airline co-branded credit card is to accelerate your mileage accrual with your carrier of choice. Frequent flyer loyalty programs are very straightforward: they allow airlines to incentivize travelers like you to keep your business with that airline by offering you credit for every mile you fly with that airline. Once you accumulate enough miles, you can then redeem them for free travel with that airline in the future.

The concept is simple enough, but every airline differs in its program management, accrual schedule, and redemption availability for award flights. For instance, just because you fly 1,504 miles from San Francisco to Austin doesn’t mean that you have now earned enough miles for another trip; rather, the 1,500-odd miles you just flew have earned you a mere fraction of what you’ll need to book an award flight.

Credit cards offered directly through an airline give you the chance to multiply your mileage earnings: The same flight between Austin and San Francisco might now earn you three times as many miles. Let’s say you paid $200 for that one-way flight using a co-branded credit card from the airline operating your flight. You could earn the 1,504 miles from the actual distance traveled, as well as an additional 2 miles per dollar spent on the card, for a total earning of 1,904 miles. Not too bad for an expense you had to incur anyway!

In addition, most airline credit cards offer generous rewards and perks such free checked bags, or airport lounge access, as well as accelerated progress toward elite status. Furthermore, many cards offer a sizable sign-up bonus of mileage points when you first open your account, which usually can get you far toward an international round-trip ticket or a couple of domestic round-trip flights.

A good airline card should combine a high value rewards program with enough exclusive perks to make it worth your loyalty. When comparing airline cards, keep an eye on the fine print for restrictive redemption policies, stingy rewards, or miles with a low redemption value.

Many airline cards offer free checked bags, priority boarding and free or sharply discounted companion tickets that reward card-carrying travelers for their loyalty to the carrier. Some even offer additional bonuses for your everyday spending, making it easier to rack up miles when you aren’t traveling.

To get the most value from an airline card, you typically need to fly often with your airline of choice to earn enough miles to recoup the card’s annual fee.

To summarize, an airline credit card will be a great fit for you if:

  • You spend a significant amount of money specifically on air travel every year. If you don’t travel often, or if the destinations you frequent aren’t offered through your airline and associated partners of choice, you might want to consider getting a generic travel credit card that allows you to transfer points to your travel program of choice. The Chase Sapphire Preferred is one of the most popular cards in this category.
  • You have good or excellent credit. You will want to have a FICO credit score of at least 670 before applying for an airline rewards credit card, which typically requires great credit. You can use the free credit check tool at CreditCards.com to check your credit score at any time without triggering a credit score hit.
  • You are able to pay off your balance each month. Interest charges are no joke, and can quickly cost you far more than your rewards are worth. Ideally, you should be debt-free and always avoid carrying a balance on any credit card you hold.

Airline vs. travel rewards cards

If you’re wondering how a card like the United MileagePlus Club card compares against or differs from the Chase Sapphire Reserve or the American Express Platinum, you’ve come to the right place for clarification.

There are three general-use travel programs offered by major credit card companies that offer travelers a wide range of flexibility in redemption options:

Chase Ultimate Rewards

  • Chase Sapphire Reserve
  • Chase Sapphire Preferred
  • Chase Ink

American Express Membership Rewards

  • American Express Premier Rewards Gold
  • American Express Platinum

Citi ThankYou Rewards

  • Citi Prestige Card

These programs are owned directly by the credit card company issuing the cards, and the points earned within these programs allow you to transfer points directly into any and all of their airline frequent flyer or hotel member programs, usually at a 1:1 ratio. Therefore, general-use travel credit cards are fantastic for infrequent travelers, and other travelers for whom the ability to transfer points into whichever airline is offering the best redemption opportunity is of serious appeal.

Airline credit cards differ in their focus on loyalty to a single brand. With the United MileagePlus Club card, for example, you earn a certain amount on every dollar you spend, but you earn bonus miles for every dollar spent on United or United-related purchases.

When choosing between an airline co-branded card and general-purpose travel credit cards, keep in mind that airline cards will be most beneficial for travelers who fly often with a single airline, and have built up brand loyalty. Here are some of the other differences, listed in one handy chart:

Airline co-branded cards vs. general-purpose travel cards

Airline co-branded cardsGeneral-purpose travel cards
Build creditBuild credit
Typically an annual feeSometimes no annual fee
Generous rewards for brand loyaltyRewards for most spending
Partnerships with other brandsFly any airline
Sign-up bonus, ongoing rewardsSign-up bonus, ongoing rewards
Often free first checked bagNo blackout dates
No foreign transaction feeNo foreign transaction fee

To further break down these differences, an airline card may look like more cost upfront, because you typically have to pay an annual fee. However, the benefits are significant as long as you continue to travel with that airline, because the perks add up: a free checked bag can save you up to $75-100 on each flight you book, while soft rewards long-term often include accelerators for racking up miles and status, as well as elite access to airline lounges and similar VIP treatment.

The miles you earn through an airline’s co-branded card are awarded by the airline to incentivize you to redeem them for future flights with that carrier. In comparison, generic points or miles earned through a general travel rewards credit card are more of a cash-back substitute than a loyalty reward.

Generic travel reward benefits are often called "miles," but they're really more like cash-equivalent points that you can spend on flights, as well as hotels and car rentals.

The Capital One Venture card is a well-known example of this type of general travel-focused credit card, because it is not tied to a specific airline carrier. The popular “two miles per dollar spent” slogan simply means you earn two points per dollar which can be transferred to a variety of partners.

If you rarely fly, and buying the cheapest flight is your typical priority, a general travel credit card may be a better fit for you. As a rule of thumb, the cheaper the flight, the more bang you'll get for your generic miles -- the exact opposite of using frequent flyer miles.

The process for purchasing flights, or hotel stays or car rentals, with generic miles is as simple as charging something online using a credit card. You purchase your flight through your credit card portal online, using your stash of banked points or miles to defray the total cost.

If, on the other hand, you fly often and are interested in building brand loyalty and elite status with an airline carrier such as United, Delta or American Airlines, your best bet is to opt for a credit card with one of these airlines. Many of the major carriers are part of airline alliances that allow you to carry over the same status you enjoy with your primary airline, so that even when you fly on partner airlines, you will enjoy the same perks and rewards for your paid travel that you have with your airline of choice.

Can you transfer miles between airlines?

A lot of people consider airline miles to be comparable to cash. However, airline miles are a little bit more like currency from different countries: Many places will not allow you to pay with money from another country, even if it’s a place with similar currency and value such as between the United States and Canada.

Similarly, you can’t transfer points between frequent flyer programs in most cases, even if the airlines are partners. Partnerships such as OneWorld, Star Alliance, and SkyTeam typically allow you to earn miles when you fly on one airline, and redeem those miles you earn for flights on a carrier within the same network. However, most of those airlines won’t allow you to transfer miles directly from one carrier to another, because there is no financial benefit to them for doing so.

But there are some exceptions to the rule. British Airways and Iberia are a classic example. The two airlines share the Avios frequent flyer program. So while your points in each program remain separate and distinct, you can transfer them freely between the two so long as both accounts are at least three months old. Again coming back to the analogy of currency, this is akin to having two bank accounts within the same country. It doesn’t matter where your money sits, so long as no cross-conversion is required.

Just because you can’t transfer points back and forth, however, doesn’t mean that you are stuck with a single carrier for life. Most airlines within the major alliances will allow you to use your mileage stash with that brand to book award flights on partner airlines.

For example, an American Airlines frequent flyer can use AAdvantage miles to book a flight on British Airways, and the cost of that ticket will be based on the American Airlines mileage award chart. So even though that traveler will physically fly on a British Airways flight, the passenger is subject to all of American’s ticketing rules; responsible for paying any change or redeposit fees to American; and must contact American – not British Airways – with any problems or issues that may arise before departure.

You might be wondering, “Why would anyone bother to do that?” There are a number of reasons that make sense: The most obvious one has to do with differing value.

British Airways is notorious for charging an incredibly high number of points for redeeming seats in first and business class. A first-class seat on Cathay Pacific between Boston and Hong Kong, for example, will cost an astronomic 200,000 Avios. In comparison, partner carrier American Airlines requires just 67,500 AAdvantage miles for that exact same flight.

On the other hand, an American Airlines economy flight from Chicago to Washington, D.C. will cost 12,500 AAdvantage miles each way, while that same flight costs only 4,500 Avios. So you might begin to see some of the considerations award travelers must keep in mind when deciding which airline to fly with, as well as which points or miles to use.

How to choose the right airline card and maximize rewards

U.S. News surveyed 1,255 airline credit card holders regarding how they use their airline credit cards and rewards program. The survey found that most cardholders use their earned rewards to take free flights, and a lot of people utilize loyalty perks such as free checked bags and priority boarding. Over 50 percent of cardholders earned more than $200 in rewards within the last 12 months of the date the survey was conducted. And around one-fifth, or 20 percent, of airline credit card holders carry a balance month to month, earning less in airline loyalty rewards than they pay in annual credit card fees.

This section contains a list of important criteria that you should to evaluate when choosing an airline card, as well as a list of tips for maximizing your rewards:

  1. Make sure you choose the rewards program that best fits your lifestyle
  2. Calculate the earning potential of your spend
  3. Don’t forget to earn your sign-up bonuses!
  4. Know the redemption value of the miles you earn
  5. Weigh the above perks against the annual fee
  6. Be aware of additional bonus benefits associated with the card

1. Pick the right rewards program for you

If you don’t mind sticking with the same airline for all or most of your travel, or if you already have status and loyalty toward a particular carrier, signing up for that airline’s credit card will allow you to cash in on your loyalty, and earn special perks for repeat travels. Some of these perks can be work a good deal more cash than just, say, casual food and drinks here or there: Airport lounge access can be worth upward of $50 per day, for instance, and free checked bags can make the savings add up very rapidly.

It’s also helpful to remember that the airline that will bring you the most value offers nonstop and/or connecting flights to the destinations you most frequently visit - in other words, if you live in Houston, you’ll most likely want to consider United because George Bush International Airport is one of United’s hub airports. If you live in Atlanta, it makes a lot of sense to make Atlanta-based Delta your carrier of choice.

2. Calculate your earning potential

Airline credit cards incentivize brand loyalty by offering you higher rewards for spending with them or their business partners. Knowing your spending habits will help you determine which card offers the best earning potential based on where you spend the most money. If you plan to sign up for a single credit card and put the bulk of your expenditures on this card, an airline-specific travel card may not give you the best return on your investment – you might want to sign up for a generic travel credit card instead.

3. Make sure you hit the spend required to earn your sign-up bonus

The biggest boost to your mileage stash often happens right in the beginning, when you first sign up for the credit card. Card issuers now offer generous sign-up bonuses that can be worth several hundred or even more than a thousand dollars in travel value – but only after you meet certain spending requirements: usually several thousand dollars over three months. The rules are pretty strict around the requirements, so plan ahead to make sure you don’t accidentally mess up.

Check our rewards chart to see what our top recommended credit cards currently offer by way of sign-up bonuses.

4. Know the redemption value of your earned miles

Airline credit cards may offer an equivalent cash value of from 1 to 5 cents per mile you earn, but it's difficult to consistently quantify the value because award flights and availability are dynamic - always changing based on demand, flight prices, routes and other factors.

Some airlines like Southwest do not publish a fixed award chart; instead, the cost of an award flight fluctuates to match the cash sticker price of the paid fare equivalent. On the other hand, airlines like American and United have fixed-rate award charts that make it easier to understand how far your miles will get you.

5. Weigh your perks against the annual fee

Are you getting $95, $195, or $450 worth out of your airline credit card each year? Calculate the potential earnings against your annual fee. For example, although $195 a year for may sound astronomical to pay for the privilege of holding a credit card, the benefits of premium lounge access and the savings in checked bag fees may easily offset that $195 fee.

6. Know about additional bonus benefits that may come with your card

In the interest of staying competitive, airline credit cards may offer additional perks that aren’t directly correlated to plane tickets. These may include:

  • No foreign transaction fees
  • Trip cancellation insurance
  • Auto rental insurance
  • Lost baggage protection
  • Roadside assistance
  • Extended warranties
  • Extended return periods
  • Concierge services

Airline credit card perks that are on the premium side may include:

  • Discounts on inflight purchases
  • Companion tickets
  • Access to airport lounges with free snacks, drinks and Wi-Fi

How much are miles worth?

It’s important to understand that every person will realize a different value from their airline redemptions, because their individual needs differ. For instance, checked bags and flight cancellation flexibility is very important for families with young children, but may not matter at all to a single young professional who travels frequently both for work as well as for leisure.

At the end of the day, the most data-driven way of valuation is to look at the fair market price tag of the ticket, when converted to points. Many airlines offer the opportunity to purchase additional miles at a promotional rate, and our partner website ThePointsGuy.com offers a monthly valuation to help guide your calculations.

As a general rule, The Points Guy suggests that you should make sure you’re earning the equivalent of 1 cent or more per mile in value from your airline miles. You can calculate this by combining of how much you would have to pay to buy the points if given the opportunity, and the overall value you would get from redeeming them in lieu of cash fare.

The value math is pretty straightforward, according to Tim Winship, editor-at-large for SmarterTravel.com and founder of FrequentFlier.com.

“Miles earned in an airline program and redeemed for flights are generally worth between 1.5 and 2 cents apiece,” he explained. “However, when those miles are redeemed for consumer goods or hotel stays, they're typically worth far less than a penny apiece.”

Our own CreditCards.com research found in most cases, airline credit card rewards are worth twice – if not three times – as much when put toward flights or other travel redemption options. Our guide here will assist you in evaluating the value of individual airline miles or points

Travel writer Jenny McIver Brocious and her husband recently bought flights to the Caribbean for February and were able to cut flight costs significantly by redeeming miles.

“The best fare on Delta was $750, but a mileage ticket was only 35,000 miles. That one is a no-brainer,” she said. “Assuming a $100 value per 10,000 miles, we got those flights to the Caribbean for less than half the normal price using our miles.”

Meanwhile, “A $250 Delta gift card goes for 35,700 miles, while a $250 Tiffany & Co. gift card goes for a whopping 52,000 miles,” she added. “In both cases, you’d get a much greater value for the miles by redeeming them for flights.”

Also, don’t forget that you must spend money in order to earn miles. Most major airline credit card programs give cardholders 2 points or miles for each dollar spent on airline-branded purchases and related travel expenses, but then only 1 mile or point per dollar spent everywhere else.

For example, if you’re a Frontier Airlines World Mastercard holder and only use your card for Frontier travel purchases, you’ll have to spend $17,599 to earn enough miles for a $100 Target gift card. If you use that card for non-Frontier travel purchases, a $100 Target gift card could cost you upward of $30,000. Suddenly that “free” gift card isn’t so free after all.

However, there may be some circumstances in which redeeming travel rewards for nontravel purchases makes sense. Maybe you can’t spend enough money to achieve the travel award you want before your points expire, or maybe you just aren’t a frequent traveler anymore. Utilizing your miles and point redemption options for other types of purchases allows you to take advantage of the rewards you earned.

“While travel is aspirational, you also have to be realistic about your lifestyle,” Papadatos said. If you’re routinely seeking nontravel reward redemption options from an airline credit card, it might be time to apply for a new rewards credit card that better fits your spending habits, such as a general cash back credit card.

“If you travel for business, airline programs probably make sense, especially if you fly or spend enough to reach the highest status tiers where you truly get recognized,” Papadatos said.

Airline miles are also known as frequent flyer miles or travel points, and are offered as an incentive from airlines to keep you loyal to their brand.

How do I redeem airline miles?

In this section, we’ll show you how you can redeem your miles. While it is possible to redeem your miles for gift cards, we very rarely suggest doing so as this is one of the least valuable redemptions out there. Instead, since you’ve focused on building up brand loyalty to a single airline and its partners, it’s best to stick with redeeming your miles for travel purchases through that brand.

Once you have your frequent flyer account set up, your airline co-branded credit card in hand, and some miles in your stash, it’s time to book your next vacation for free!

  • You’ll start by heading directly to your airline’s website.

Redeeming your miles for flights is usually quite straightforward. On your airline website’s reservations page, there usually will be an option for you to select “book awards flights” or “use miles.” For instance, on the United.com website, the page looks like this, with a little checkbox to search for award travel below the ticket quantity field:

airline website reservation

The Delta.com website offers a toggle with options for paying by “money” or “miles” right above the “find flights” button:

Delta website reservation money and miles options

The American Airlines website offers the option of “redeeming miles” in the top right corner of the booking form:

American Airlines website reservation with miles redemption option

Finally, Southwest also offers the option to select between booking with dollars or booking with points, directly at the top right of the reservations widget:

Southwest website's options for booking with dollars and points
  • Enter your rewards number, and search for the flight you want to take
  • Your search results will show the number of miles needed to book the flight, as well as any additional cost per ticket (most flights will include taxes and fees which, by law, cannot be discounted). Also, airlines often charge a fee for booking tickets last-minute, so you’ll want to plan ahead by at least a few weeks whenever possible.
  • Book your ticket!

There may be other considerations as you book. Airlines typically only offer a certain number of award seats per flight, so your itinerary options will be more limited than if you were paying cash for your ticket. Furthermore, blackout dates may apply during peak travel times such as holidays or summer break, so you will want to check early and often for available flights as soon as you know the dates you want to travel.

How many miles do you need for a free flight?

The number of miles you will need for a free flight will vary based on the airline, as well as your origin and destination airports. Miles are not equal – the value depends on the airline, the trip, the date and the type of seat.

You can also do your own check to see how many miles you need from the airline’s website: Just look under the reservations page, and search for the section that mentions award flights. Most will offer a chart showing the regions to which they travel – usually broken down by continents – as well as a schedule showing how many miles it takes to get from one region to another.

For instance, the lowest one-way domestic fares on American Airlines will cost you 12,500 AAdvantage miles within the continental U.S., although the same flight will only cost you 4,500 Avios when booked through OneWorld partner carrier British Airways.

While you want to make sure your credit card miles are worth at least one cent per mile, credit card miles can actually be worth five cents or more apiece. Frequent flyer miles are worth more per mile when redeemed for long-haul flights, or for business or first-class seats.

What can I get for my airline card's miles?

The answer to this question will vary based on each individual airline’s redemption and valuations.

To get the most value of your hard-earned airline rewards, it’s usually best to use miles and points for what they were designed for: travel.

“Each airline or credit card provider will determine what the value proposition or benefits are for their own card, but flight rewards can indeed be advantageous in an airline credit card partnership since the airline is in control of its own costs and the credit card it is subsidizing,” said Caroline Papadatos, senior vice president of global solutions for LoyaltyOne.

Here are a few examples of what your miles are worth with some popular airlines and their co-branded credit card sign-up bonuses.

What can you get with 30,000 SkyMiles?

While Delta offers a variety of redemption options for your SkyMiles – including merchandise and gift cards – your best option, by far, is redeeming SkyMiles for airfare on Delta or with one of Delta’s 19 SkyTeam alliance partners. The number of required miles is closely linked to the cost of the fare, and you will find a good value with most flights and fare levels. We value SkyMiles at 1.35 cents per miles on average, so 70,000 miles can get you around $945 worth of airfare on Delta.

Delta SkyMiles redemption options

Redemption OptionAverage Mile ValueValue of 30,000-Mile Intro Bonus
Flights1.35 cents$405
Flight upgrades2.2 cents$660
Delta Sky Club membership1.1 cents$330
Car rentals0.6 cents$180
Merchandise0.4 cents$120
Gift cards0.3-0.5 cents$90-$150
Magazines0.8 cents$240
ExperiencesVaries--
Charity donation1.35 cents$405

Best ways to spend 40,000 MileagePlus miles

You can go a long way with 40,000 miles on United. Not only can you use them to travel all around the world on United flights, but you can use them for flights on one of United’s Star Alliance partners (28 partners in total) for a good value. MileagePlus miles are very valuable – worth 1.52 cents per mile by our estimates – but the value can vary depending on how you use them.

As you can see from our redemption chart below, you have many redemption options beside airfare, but most other options have a very poor value:

United MileagePlus redemption options

Redemption OptionAverage Mile ValueValue of 40,000-Mile Sign-up Bonus
Saver airfare – economy2.3 cents$920
Saver airfare – business/first class3.5 cents$1,400
Everyday airfare – economy1 cent$400
Everyday airfare – business/first class1.2 cents$480
Hotels0.8 cents$320
Car rentals0.9 cents$360
Cruises1.1 cents$440
Merchandise0.6 cent$240
ExperiencesVariesVaries
Dining3.8 cents$1,520
Magazine subscription2.2 cents$880
Newspaper subscription2.5 cents$1,000
TSA PreCheck1 cent$400
In-flight Wi-Fi0.7 cents$280
United Club membership0.8 cents$320
Charity donation1.52 cents$608
Membership fee reimbursement0.8 cents$320

When it comes to United, it’s all about Saver awards. You can get more than 2 cents of value out your miles with an economy-level Saver fare. And Business class Saver fares offer an exceptional value at 3.5 cents per mile on average. In fact, the pricing on Business class Saver awards is so reasonable that cardholders who normally couldn’t afford business class could easily rack up enough United Miles to fund a round-trip ticket to Europe or Asia in business class.

That said, business-class flights across the Atlantic start at 60,000 miles for a one-way ticket, so you’ll have to save up a few more miles to afford a round-trip fare.

Best way to use the Southwest Rapid Rewards cards’ sign-up bonus

While the Southwest cards offer a few different redemption options, airfare is by far the best option. Southwest has three fare tiers: Wanna Get Away, Anytime and Business Select, with Wanna Get Away fares providing the best value.

The value per point varies by flight, but averages around 1.6 cents per point for a Wanna Get Away fare. You can get even higher values if you are flexible, shop carefully for your ticket and buy your ticket far in advance while the best-priced fares are still available. Business Select fares have a very poor value – less than 1 cent per point on average. Note, the points cover the base fare and do not include taxes and fees.

Through the More Rewards site, you have more redemption options, including gift cards, cruises, car rentals, hotels and merchandise. These have a poor value – hotels are by far the worst at a mere 0.2 cents per point. Your best option on the More Rewards site is gift cards, which are worth 1 cent per point when you buy them in $100 increments or larger. However, if you want to get the most out of your bonus points, you should stick to redeeming them for airfare.

Southwest Rapid Rewards redemption options

Redemption OptionAverage Point ValueValue of 50,000-Point Sign-up Bonus
Wanna Get Away fare1.6 cents$800
Anytime fare1.1 cents$550
Business Select fare0.9 cents$450
$100 gift card1 cent$500
$50 gift card0.83 cents$415
Car rental0.7 cents$350
Merchandise0.6 cents$300
Hotel0.2 cents$100

List of airline travel partners

Earlier, we mentioned that Partnerships such as OneWorld, Star Alliance, and SkyTeam typically allow you to earn miles when you fly on one airline, and redeem those miles you earn for flights on a carrier within the same network. However, most of those airlines won’t allow you to transfer miles directly between carriers, because there is no financial benefit to them for doing so. Instead, you will have to look for co-shared flights directly through the airline with which you hold mileage accounts. You can book these co-share flights through the website or by calling in to the airline’s agents.

These are the three major alliances and their partner airlines:

OneWorld includes 13 carriers:

  • American Airlines
  • British Airways
  • Cathay Pacific Airways
  • Finnair
  • Iberia
  • Japan Airlines
  • LATAM Airlines
  • Malaysia Airlines
  • Qantas
  • Qatar Airways
  • Royal Jordanian
  • S7 Airlines
  • SriLankan Airlines

Skyteam includes 20 partner airlines:

  • Aeroflot
  • AerolineasArgentinas
  • Aeromexico
  • AirEuropa
  • AirFrance
  • Alitalia
  • China Airlines
  • China Eastern
  • China Southern
  • Czech Airlines
  • Delta
  • Garuda Indonesia
  • Kenya Airways
  • KLM
  • Korean Air
  • MEA
  • Saudia
  • Tarom
  • Vietnam Airlines
  • XiamenAir

Star Alliance includes 27 partner airlines

  • Adria
  • Aegean
  • Air Canada
  • Air China
  • Air India
  • Air New Zealand
  • ANA
  • Asiana Airlines
  • Austrian
  • Avianca
  • Brussels Airlines
  • Copa Airlines
  • Croatia Airlines
  • EgyptAir
  • Ethiopian
  • Eva Air
  • Polish Airlines
  • Lufthansa
  • SAS
  • Shenzhen Airlines
  • Singapore Airlines
  • South African Airways
  • Swiss Air
  • Portugal
  • Thai
  • Turkish Airlines
  • United

In Review: The Best Airline Miles Credit Cards of 2018

Credit CardAirline & Best UseCreditCards.com RatingSign-Up BonusRequired Spend
Chase Sapphire Preferred® CardAll airlines (flexible travel rewards)4.2 / 550,000 Points$4,000 / 3 months
Citi® / AAdvantage® Platinum Select World Elite™ Mastercard®American (large sign-up bonus)4.3 / 560,000 Miles$3,000 / 3 months
Gold Delta SkyMiles® Credit Card from American ExpressDelta (easy sign-up bonus)3.2 / 530,000 Miles$1,000 / 3 months
Southwest Rapid Rewards® Plus Credit CardSouthwest (low cost)3.2 / 540,000 Points$1,000 / 3 months
Southwest Rapid Rewards® Premier Credit CardSouthwest (annual bonus)3.2 / 540,000 Points$1,000 / 3 months
United MileagePlus® Explorer CardUnited (sign-up bonus)3.4 / 540,000 Miles$2,000 / 3 months
Blue Delta SkyMiles® Credit Card from American ExpressDelta (no annual fee)2.6 / 510,000 Miles$500 / 3 months
Alaska Airlines Visa Signature® Credit CardAlaska (transfer program)4.2 / 530,000 Miles$1,000 / 90 days
Citi® / AAdvantage® Executive World Elite™ Mastercard®American (business travelers)3.6 / 550,000 Miles$5,000 / 3 months
British Airways Visa Signature® CardBritish (Avios bonus)4.3 / 550,000 Avios$3,000 / 3 months

Related Travel and Rewards Card Categories:

Check out our reviews

If you're interested in learning more about airline credit cards, check out our reviews section where we go into detail about our top picks and several others.

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