Best Balance Transfer Credit Cards

If you are managing debt, a balance transfer credit card could help you pay down debt faster by transferring an existing balance to a new card with lower interest. We analyzed hundreds of balance transfer cards to find the most favorable introductory offers with low interest and low fees. Compare our picks for the best balance transfer credit cards from our partners and see how much each card could help you save.

If you are managing debt, a balance transfer credit card could help you pay down debt faster by transferring an existing balance to a new card with lower interest. We analyzed hundreds of balance transfer cards to find the most favorable introductory offers with low interest and low fees. Compare our picks for the best balance transfer credit cards from our partners and see how much each card could help you save.

Written by: Jeanine Skowronski | Edited by: Tracy Stewart | Reviewed by: Ted Rossman

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April 20, 2021

Here are the best balance transfer credit cards of April 2021:

Wells Fargo Platinum card

Good to Excellent

Credit Recommended (670-850)

CreditCards.com credit ranges are a variation of FICO® Score 8, one of many types of credit scores lenders may use when considering your credit card application.
Apply Now

Estimated Balance Transfer Savings

$373
Savings based on a transfer amount of $2,500 at a current APR of 15%
Learn more about our calculations
Estimated Savings is a CreditCards.com calculation that is used to provide an example of how much you might save by transferring your balances to a new card after factoring in fees, length of promotional periods and interest charges. This amount is based on the transfer amount and does not assume rewards or purchases, since those will vary per individual.

Estimated savings are based on the following amounts: Transfer Amount: $2,500, Current APR: 15.00%, Monthly Repayment: $56.25, Savings Period: 24 mos., with the Intro Balance Transfer Period at the Intro Balance Transfer APR rate, plus any remaining months at the Regular APR.

At A Glance

Intro Balance Transfer APR
0% intro APR for 18 months on qualifying balance transfers
Intro Balance Transfer Period
0% intro APR for 18 months on qualifying balance transfers
Regular Balance Transfer APR
16.49% - 24.49% variable
Citi® Double Cash Card

Good to Excellent

Credit Recommended (670-850)

CreditCards.com credit ranges are a variation of FICO® Score 8, one of many types of credit scores lenders may use when considering your credit card application.
Apply Now

Estimated Balance Transfer Savings

$440
Savings based on a transfer amount of $2,500 at a current APR of 15%
Learn more about our calculations
Estimated Savings is a CreditCards.com calculation that is used to provide an example of how much you might save by transferring your balances to a new card after factoring in fees, length of promotional periods and interest charges. This amount is based on the transfer amount and does not assume rewards or purchases, since those will vary per individual.

Estimated savings are based on the following amounts: Transfer Amount: $2,500, Current APR: 15.00%, Monthly Repayment: $56.25, Savings Period: 24 mos., with the Intro Balance Transfer Period at the Intro Balance Transfer APR rate, plus any remaining months at the Regular APR.

At A Glance

Intro Balance Transfer APR
0%
Intro Balance Transfer Period
18 months
Regular Balance Transfer APR
13.99% - 23.99% (Variable)
Bank of America® Cash Rewards credit card

Good to Excellent

Credit Recommended (670-850)

CreditCards.com credit ranges are a variation of FICO® Score 8, one of many types of credit scores lenders may use when considering your credit card application.
Apply Now

Estimated Balance Transfer Savings

$351
Savings based on a transfer amount of $2,500 at a current APR of 15%
Learn more about our calculations
Estimated Savings is a CreditCards.com calculation that is used to provide an example of how much you might save by transferring your balances to a new card after factoring in fees, length of promotional periods and interest charges. This amount is based on the transfer amount and does not assume rewards or purchases, since those will vary per individual.

Estimated savings are based on the following amounts: Transfer Amount: $2,500, Current APR: 15.00%, Monthly Repayment: $56.25, Savings Period: 24 mos., with the Intro Balance Transfer Period at the Intro Balance Transfer APR rate, plus any remaining months at the Regular APR.

At A Glance

Intro Balance Transfer APR
0% Intro APR for 15 billing cycles for any BTs made in the first 60 days. A 3% fee (min. $10) applies.
Intro Balance Transfer Period
0% Intro APR for 15 billing cycles for any BTs made in the first 60 days. A 3% fee (min. $10) applies.
Regular Balance Transfer APR
13.99% - 23.99% Variable APR on purchases and balance transfers
BankAmericard® credit card

Good to Excellent

Credit Recommended (670-850)

CreditCards.com credit ranges are a variation of FICO® Score 8, one of many types of credit scores lenders may use when considering your credit card application.
Apply Now

Estimated Balance Transfer Savings

$447
Savings based on a transfer amount of $2,500 at a current APR of 15%
Learn more about our calculations
Estimated Savings is a CreditCards.com calculation that is used to provide an example of how much you might save by transferring your balances to a new card after factoring in fees, length of promotional periods and interest charges. This amount is based on the transfer amount and does not assume rewards or purchases, since those will vary per individual.

Estimated savings are based on the following amounts: Transfer Amount: $2,500, Current APR: 15.00%, Monthly Repayment: $56.25, Savings Period: 24 mos., with the Intro Balance Transfer Period at the Intro Balance Transfer APR rate, plus any remaining months at the Regular APR.

At A Glance

Intro Balance Transfer APR
0% Intro APR for 18 billing cycles for any BTs made in the first 60 days. A 3% fee (min. $10) applies.
Intro Balance Transfer Period
0% Intro APR for 18 billing cycles for any BTs made in the first 60 days. A 3% fee (min. $10) applies.
Regular Balance Transfer APR
12.99% - 22.99% Variable APR on purchases and balance transfers
Wells Fargo Cash Wise Visa® card

Good to Excellent

Credit Recommended (670-850)

CreditCards.com credit ranges are a variation of FICO® Score 8, one of many types of credit scores lenders may use when considering your credit card application.
Apply Now

Estimated Balance Transfer Savings

$283
Savings based on a transfer amount of $2,500 at a current APR of 15%
Learn more about our calculations
Estimated Savings is a CreditCards.com calculation that is used to provide an example of how much you might save by transferring your balances to a new card after factoring in fees, length of promotional periods and interest charges. This amount is based on the transfer amount and does not assume rewards or purchases, since those will vary per individual.

Estimated savings are based on the following amounts: Transfer Amount: $2,500, Current APR: 15.00%, Monthly Repayment: $56.25, Savings Period: 24 mos., with the Intro Balance Transfer Period at the Intro Balance Transfer APR rate, plus any remaining months at the Regular APR.

At A Glance

Intro Balance Transfer APR
0% intro APR for 15 months on qualifying balance transfers
Intro Balance Transfer Period
0% intro APR for 15 months on qualifying balance transfers
Regular Balance Transfer APR
14.49% - 24.99% variable
Citi Rewards+® Card

Good to Excellent

Credit Recommended (670-850)

CreditCards.com credit ranges are a variation of FICO® Score 8, one of many types of credit scores lenders may use when considering your credit card application.
Apply Now

Estimated Balance Transfer Savings

$357
Savings based on a transfer amount of $2,500 at a current APR of 15%
Learn more about our calculations
Estimated Savings is a CreditCards.com calculation that is used to provide an example of how much you might save by transferring your balances to a new card after factoring in fees, length of promotional periods and interest charges. This amount is based on the transfer amount and does not assume rewards or purchases, since those will vary per individual.

Estimated savings are based on the following amounts: Transfer Amount: $2,500, Current APR: 15.00%, Monthly Repayment: $56.25, Savings Period: 24 mos., with the Intro Balance Transfer Period at the Intro Balance Transfer APR rate, plus any remaining months at the Regular APR.

At A Glance

Intro Balance Transfer APR
0%
Intro Balance Transfer Period
15 months
Regular Balance Transfer APR
13.49% - 23.49% (Variable)
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Editorial disclosure: All reviews are prepared by CreditCards.com staff. Opinions expressed therein are solely those of the reviewer and have not been reviewed or approved by any advertiser. The information, including card rates and fees, presented in the review is accurate as of the date of the review. Check the data at the top of this page and the bank's website for the most current information.

All information about Citi Simplicity® Card, Navy Federal® Platinum Credit Card, and the U.S. Bank Visa Platinum has been collected independently by CreditCards.com and has not been reviewed by the issuer.


best balance transfer credit cards of 2021

A guide to the best balance transfer credit cards

If you feel like you are in a never-ending cycle of credit card debt, there just might be a solution – consider the balance transfer card.

Used correctly, a balance transfer card can help you get hold of your debt and allow you to save on interest charges for a set amount of time. Here, we share how these credit cards work, when they are a good or a bad idea, and we offer examples of great cards to choose from.

Comparing the best balance transfer credit cards

Credit cardBest forBalance Transfer Intro APR OfferRegular APR
Citi® Diamond Preferred® CardBalance transfers0% intro APR for 18 months, for transfers made within the first 4 months14.74%-24.74% variable
Wells Fargo Platinum card0% intro APR0% intro APR for 18 months, on qualifying transfers made in first 120 days16.49%-24.49% variable
Citi® Double Cash CardCash rewards0% intro APR for 18 months13.99%-23.99% variable
Bank of America® Cash Rewards credit cardEveryday spending0% intro APR for 15 billing cycles, for transfers made within first 60 days13.99%-23.99% variable
BankAmericard® credit cardLow interest0% intro APR for 18 billing cycles, for transfers made in first 60 days12.99%-22.99% variable
Wells Fargo Cash Wise Visa® cardSign-up bonus0% intro APR for 15 months on qualifying balance transfers14.49%-24.99% variable
Citi Rewards+® CardSupermarkets and gas stations0% intro APR for 15 months from date of first transfer13.49%-23.49% variable

Editor’s picks: Balance transfer credit card details

Best for balance transfers: Citi® Diamond Preferred® Card

Why we picked it: This card pairs one of the longest balance transfer offers currently on the market with a potentially low go-to interest rate: Cardholders receive a 0% introductory APR for 18 months on balance transfers made in the first 4 months (the APR is 14.74%-24.74% variable after that).

Pros: The 18-month 0% introductory APR extends to purchases, too (14.74% to 24.74% variable after that). Plus, there’s no annual fee.

Cons: You’ll pay a balance transfer fee of 3% (or $5, whichever is higher). There’s no base rewards program, so its long-term value will be limited, though you will enjoy a few ancillary benefits, like access to Citi EntertainmentSM, Citi Flex Plan and the Citi Easy Deals program.

Read our full Citi Diamond Preferred Card review.

Best for 0% intro APR: Wells Fargo Platinum card

Why we picked it: With this card, you get the best of both worlds: a long (18 months from account opening) 0% introductory APR period on both qualifying balance transfers made in the first 120 days and on new purchases. After that, it’s 16.49% to 24.49% variable.

Pros: The card carries no annual fee. Like the Citi Diamond Preferred, this card carries no base rewards program, but you will get some ancillary benefits, like cellphone insurance. Pay your cellphone bill with the card and you can be reimbursed up to $600 per claim and $1,200 per year should your phone be damaged or stolen (subject to a $25 deductible).

Cons: You must transfer the balance within your first 120 days as a cardholder to receive the intro APR. You’ll pay a balance transfer fee: 3% if you transfer the balance within 120 days; 5% if you don’t (with a $5 minimum).

Read the full Wells Fargo Platinum card review.

Best for cash rewards: Citi® Double Cash Card

Why we picked it: While some cards may require you to sacrifice long-term value for a great balance transfer offer, the Citi Double Cash does not. In addition to an introductory 18-month zero interest offer on balance transfers (then a variable APR of 13.99% to 23.99% after that), you’ll earn 1% cash back when you make a purchase and another 1% as you pay your balance.

Pros: The base rewards, paired with that lengthy balance transfer offer, are the real highlight here. The potential to earn 2% cash back (1% when you buy and 1% as you pay), after all, is competitive among the best rewards credit cards. Plus, there’s no annual fee.

Cons: You’ll need good-to-excellent credit to qualify for the card, so people with bad, fair or thin credit might need to look elsewhere. (See the best credit cards for fair credit.) There’s no 0% introductory APR offer for purchases. You’ll pay a balance transfer fee of $5 or 3%, whichever is higher.

Read the full Citi Double Cash review.

Best for everyday spending: Bank of America® Cash Rewards credit card

Why we picked it: The card pairs a competitive balance transfer offer (0% intro APR for the first 15 billing cycles on balance transfers made in the first 60 days, then 13.99% to 23.99% variable) with solid rewards for everyday spending.

Pros: The Bank of America Cash Rewards card offers a solid 3% cash back on a category of your choice and 2% cash back at grocery stores and wholesale clubs (on the first $2,500 in combined choice category/grocery store/wholesale club purchases each quarter, then earn 1%). There’s no annual fee for the card.

Cons: The 0% introductory APR period for balance transfers is good, though certainly not the longest one out there. Plus, you’ll have to act fast to capitalize on that intro APR. (As we mentioned earlier, only balance transfers made within the first 60 days of opening an account qualify.) A 3% fee (minimum $10) applies to all balance transfers.

Read the full Bank of America Cash Rewards credit card review.

Best for low interest: BankAmericard® credit card

Why we picked it: The BankAmericard allows you 18 billing cycles to work on paying off a balance transfer (made within the first 60 days) without accruing interest. After that, your interest rate could still be quite low. The regular APR is 12.99% to 22.99% variable, which is good, especially if you can secure an interest rate at the low end of that spectrum.

Pros: The 18-month 0% introductory rate also extends to purchases (12.99% to 22.99% variable after that). There is no rewards program, but you still have access to money-saving perks with BankAmeriDeals, Bank of America’s card-linked cash back offers. You won’t pay an annual fee.

Cons: Again, you’ll need to act fast to capitalize on the balance transfer offer, given it applies only to balances transferred in your first 60 days. You’ll pay a balance transfer fee of 3% or $10 (whichever is greater).

Read the full BankAmericard credit card review.

Best for sign-up bonus: Wells Fargo Cash Wise Visa® card

Why we picked it: This card comes with a solid introductory APR on both balance transfers and new purchases: Pay 0% for 15 months from account opening on new purchases and on qualifying balance transfers made in the first 120 days (14.49% to 24.99% variable after that).

Pros: Your first few months of card membership have the opportunity to be quite lucrative if you achieve the sign-up bonus of $150 after spending just $500 in the first 3 months. Cardholders also receive 1.8% cash rewards on Google Pay™ and Apple Pay® purchases for the first 12 months from account opening. For a base rewards program, the card offers 1.5% cash rewards on general purchases. (See the best cash back credit cards.) There’s no annual fee.

Cons: Keep in mind that the 120-day period is extra limiting because the card’s balance transfer fee increases from 3% (or $5, whichever is greater) to up to 5% ($5 minimum) after that period ends. A sign-up bonus sounds nice, but you won’t really reap rewards if it precludes you from paying off that transferred balance on-time.

Read the full Wells Fargo Cash Wise credit card review.

Best for supermarkets and gas stations: Citi Rewards+® Card

Why we picked it: This Citi card pairs a competitive balance transfer offer (0% for 15 months from the date of your first transfer, then 13.49% to 23.49% variable) with solid rewards on two popular spending categories.

Pros: In addition to rewarding 2 ThankYou points per dollar spent at supermarkets and gas stations (up to $6,000 per year in purchases, then 1 point per dollar), Citi will round up each purchase to the nearest 10 points. The 15-month 0% introductory APR applies to purchases, too (13.49% to 23.49% variable after that).

Cons: The introductory APR of 0% for 15 months on balance transfers from date of first transfer (13.49%-23.49% variable after that) is one of the shorter offers on the balance transfer market, but it still gives you more than a year to pay down debt with 0% interest. There’s a balance transfer fee of 3% or $5 (whichever is greater).

Read the full Citi Rewards+ credit card review.

What is a balance transfer credit card?

According to a CreditCards.com poll conducted in December 2020, 51% of U.S. adults with credit card debt have added to it during the pandemic. Credit card balances often end up costing consumers who are already experiencing financial hardship hundreds or more in interest charges, making it even more difficult to pay off debt. That’s where a balance transfer card comes in.

A balance transfer card allows you to move your credit card debt from older cards to a new card, often with a lower interest rate. The main benefits of a balance transfer credit card include:

  • Avoid interest. This is a great tool for temporarily avoiding interest charges since many offer a 0% intro offer of 6-18 months. By paying no interest for a period of time, you’ll save money on interest, pay over a shorter period of time and pay less overall.
  • Consolidate debt. If you are looking to simplify payments into one bill, a balance transfer card is an option. This can help ensure you pay on time because you only have one bill to worry about.

What is a balance transfer fee?

Credit cards typically make their profit through fees and interest charges. When a card presents a 0% intro APR offer on a balance transfer, it’s losing out on the interest charges you would normally pay for carrying a balance into the next month. To help make up for that, issuers will usually charge a balance transfer fee.

You pay a balance transfer fee when you make a transfer from one card to another. The card issuer taking over the balance charges the fee, which is usually 3%-5% or $5-$10, whichever is greater. While difficult, it’s not impossible to negotiate a lower balance transfer fee. A precious few waive any balance transfer fees, and when they do, they may not have the rewards or longer offer you might be looking for.

How to save money with a credit card balance transfer

So why would you get a balance transfer card? Here’s the deal: They often come with a temporary 0% interest rate. But instead of the endless game of transferring your debt, we advise you to pay off the balance before the offer ends. This can easily save you hundreds of dollars, provided you pay the bulk of the debt before the 0% APR offer ends. Offers can be for 6 months to 18 months, taking you well into 2022.

If you don’t pay off the balance before the offer ends, the go-to rate, usually the regular APR, kicks in. But it’s not deferred. So, if you have a $3,000 balance, and you pay $2,400 before the offer ends, you will only pay interest on the remaining $600.

Look into low interest offers

If you anticipate that you might still have a balance after the 0% intro APR offer ends, take a look at balance transfer cards with low interest rates. Here are a couple we like.

Keep in mind that the better your credit, the lower your regular APR will likely be on a card. Taking a look at the Alliant Visa, imagine you will owe $600 and you plan to pay $100 a month. If you get the APR rate of 22.24%, you will owe $43 in interest. If you get the APR rate of 10.24%, you will owe $19 in interest, more than half that of the higher interest rate. That said, it’s always best to pay down all of your debt before the 0% intro APR offer of a balance transfer card ends. However, if that’s not possible, a card that has relatively low interest could be a life-saver.

Understand your savings

There are a number of items that will cut your costs when looking at a balance transfer card, including annual fee, balance transfer fees, length of offer and whether you will have a balance when the offer ends. Here, we put it all together, with the amount owed for both at $3,000 and the monthly payment at $200. One example has a balance transfer fee and the other does not:

Credit cardBalance transfer fee0% intro APR offerInterest paidAnnual feeSavings after fees and interest
Citi® Diamond Preferred®$9018 months, then 14.74%-24.74% variable$0$0$253
Navy Federal® Platinum Credit Card$012 months, then 5.99%-18.00% variable$16, when paying 15% for remaining $600 at $200 a month$0$327

Pros and cons of a balance transfer credit card

Pros: When does a balance transfer make sense?

  • Avoid paying high interest. If you want to avoid interest rates for a period of time, a balance transfer credit card is a great way to achieve that, because many of these cards offer a 0% intro APR. Keep in mind that you will pay interest on any balance you have after the offer ends (typically 6-18 months), but if you can pay off the debt before that, you can save hundreds of dollars.
  • Consolidate debt. With a balance transfer card, you can consolidate debt from multiple cards, then pay a single bill each month. You might do this for convenience or for budgeting purposes.
  • Improve your credit score. Once you’ve paid off your balance, you might have improved your credit score, notably your credit utilization ratio. You will also have a higher overall credit limit. By expanding available credit and paying down debt, you can improve your score.

Cons: When does a balance transfer not make sense?

  • You keep making late payments. Instead, set up an automatic payment through your bank and schedule it a few days before your due date to be on the safe side.
  • You keep incurring debt. Track your spending for a month, forgetting nothing. Then make a budget that includes room for fun and room for emergencies. Do the same with your credit card spending, and check your spending every week to make sure you are on track.
  • You would not pay off before the offer ends. Instead, look at cards with longer offers, which can be up to 18 months. That will allow you to pay a little less each month, and at the same time avoid interest. You’ll likely have to forgo the shiny object of rewards – you need to choose your priorities, and paying down debt should be your first consideration.
  • You owe a small amount. Because most BT cards have a balance transfer fee of up to 5% of the transfer, you may want to opt out of a balance transfer card and pay down the debt quickly.

How to choose a balance transfer credit card

When considering your balance transfer card options, not only the process (having a good credit score), but also any fees, the offer length and even rewards.

  • Your credit score. Most balance transfer cards require good or excellent credit, so watch out for that. You don’t want to apply for multiple cards or apply for a card you don’t have a good chance of landing, so be careful of that as well.
  • The introductory offer. The length of offer is a top concern, because it means you might have more time to pay off your balance.
  • Terms and conditions. A few balance transfer cards offer no balance transfer fee, and most offer no annual fee. Check for other terms, such as deadlines for when the transfers have to be made by.
  • Rewards. Some balance transfer cards offer rewards, although those cards usually have a shorter 0% intro offer. That said, if you are looking for a card for the long haul, rewards may be something to consider.

How to do a balance transfer

If you’re considering a balance transfer card, you may be wondering how much work goes into moving the balance from one card to another. Overall, the process is relatively simple on the end of the cardholder. Here are the steps you should follow:

  1. Check the rules. Pay attention to the rules, because some cards require the transfer to be made within 60 days of approval.
  2. Collect your information. Next, gather the account details for the card that has the debt – referred to as the “transfer from” card – including the account number and card balance.
  3. Contact customer service. After receiving your balance transfer card, call customer service and inform them that you want to transfer a balance onto your new card. Once you provide them with the necessary information, they will reach out to the old card company and move the requested amount onto your new card.
  4. Keep paying the minimum. We recommend that you pay the minimum amount on your old card until the transfer closes to avoid late fees and other penalties.
  5. Avoid new, unplanned charges. While you might have a card that offers 0% APR on new purchases for a limited time, make sure you have a plan before you use it. That way, you don’t go into further debt.

Survey: 51% of U.S. adults have added to their credit card debt during the pandemic

The coronavirus continues to take a toll on Americans’ health and financial well-being.
Just over half (51 percent) of U.S. adults have added to their credit card debt during the pandemic, according to a recent poll by CreditCards.com – and nearly half of those adults (44 percent) specifically blame the pandemic for their burgeoning balances.


“The economic effects of the pandemic have caused many Americans to lose their jobs or leave the workforce to shoulder caregiving responsibilities,” says Ted Rossman, senior industry analyst at CreditCards.com. “As a result of this unexpected and, in many cases, prolonged drop in household income, people may have turned to credit cards to cover their monthly bills or everyday living expenses.”

The CreditCards.com survey found a majority (70 percent) of U.S. adults have personal debt of some kind. Fortunately, these respondents feel optimistic about their ability to get out of the red: 64 percent of debtors believed they would be debt-free within 10 years.

If you are dealing with debt due to the pandemic (or otherwise), there are ways to take more control over your finances. A balance transfer credit card, for instance, can mitigate some of the costs associated with high interest credit card debt by allowing cardholders to transfer an existing balance onto a new credit card offering a zero-percent introductory APR for a set period of time, usually between 12 to 20 months.

Learn more strategies for paying down credit card debt.

Alternatives to a balance transfer

Get a personal loan

Depending on your situation and the offers available to you, it might make more sense to consolidate your debt with a personal loan. Personal loans can have a lower interest rate than a credit card, and there are a number of options available.

Renegotiate regular APR

This involves simply making a phone call. Check with your card issuer to see if they’ll lower your interest rate. Our research has shown that by calling, fees can get waived and interest rates can be lowered, if you keep things pleasant and you have a good track record with the issuer.

Create an austere budget

This is the toughest option, but perhaps the most straightforward. Instead of applying for a balance transfer card, consider bulking up on your monthly payments and forgo café lattes and restaurants for a while. Tough to do, but you will pay significantly less interest than if you keep paying the minimum.

How we picked the best credit cards for balance transfers

Research methodology: We analyzed 1,002 credit cards to identify the top balance transfer credit cards on the market. While a large number of factors contribute to the quality of a credit card, the following were our most important criteria in evaluating and choosing the best balance transfer cards:

  • Length of 0% intro APR period: The longest balance transfer offers on the market currently offer 0% intro APR periods on balance transfers that last between 15 to 18 months. Historically, there have been offers that tout a 0% intro APR on balance transfers for close to two years.
  • Balance transfer fee: Most credit cards charge a balance transfer fee between 3% to 5% of the transferred balance (minimums apply). A few cards have historically skipped the charge or waived the charge if a balance is transferred within a certain time period.
  • Regular APR after the intro period: There’s always a chance that cardholders won’t pay their balance off by the time the 0% introductory APR expires. As such, we considered whether the go-to APR on that balance was reasonable, compared to the current industry average. (See the current average credit card interest rates.)
  • Annual fee: The best balance transfer credit cards minimize the cost of a credit card so cardholders have more money to put toward their balance. As such, we more heavily weighted credit cards with no annual fee.

Our full criteria include: 0% intro APR period for balance transfers, balance transfer fees, regular APR, savings period, current APR assumption, monthly payment assumption, other rates and fees, customer service, credit needed, security, ease of application, potential rewards and miscellaneous benefits.

Additional balance transfer resources


Frequently Asked Questions