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Split travel cost between two rewards cards: Is your trip covered?

Summary

If you want to split the cost of a trip between two rewards credit cards, you might, or might not, receive full travel protection from both. To find out, read the terms and conditions of each card, or contact your issuer.

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Dear Cashing In,

My husband and I are going on a cruise. I have both the Citi AAdvantage Platinum Select World Elite Mastercard and the Costco Anywhere Visa. Can I split our cruise expense and be covered by the travel protection of $5,000 for the Mastercard and the $3,000 for the Visa card? – Vera

Dear Vera,

This is an intriguing question – and a potentially ingenious idea on your part.

Many people probably have no idea their reward credit cards come with travel protection benefits.

Airlines and travel providers routinely offer travelers the option of buying extra travel insurance at the time of purchase. But typically, if you have a rewards credit card, you already have at least some coverage in case something goes wrong.

Check out all the answers from our credit card experts.

Ask Tony a question.

See related: 11 credit card travel insurance benefits

Travel benefits offered by rewards cards

This coverage varies by card and by card issuer, of course. Typically, reward cards come with insurance that covers costs such as an unanticipated and serious illness, trip cancellations and delays, and lost or delayed luggage.

  • To be eligible, you have to use the card to pay for the trip.
  • You have to submit a claim and provide plenty of documentation.
  • Usually, the credit card company outsources the work to an outside insurance company.
  • Often, the coverage is less comprehensive than privately purchased travel insurance, but if you encounter problems with travel, it’s better than nothing.

Coverage implications of paying trip with two different cards

In your case, you’re asking if you can split the cost between two cards – which both happen to come from Citi – and receive the full benefit of the protection.

The Citi AAdvantage card is limited to $5,000 for trip interruption or cancellation coverage per person, while the Costco card caps its benefits at $3,000 per person.

In these situations, you can often figure out a lot by reading the terms and conditions of the coverage. They will explain any limitations or restrictions.

  • In your case, they say that the coverage is limited to either the above amounts or the amount you charged on the card for the trip, whichever is less.
  • Those terms also stipulate that the coverage is secondary to any other insurance you might have or to any reimbursements the travel provider might offer.

Those are the terms that the company offering the coverage is legally bound by, and there is nothing in the terms and conditions that explicitly disallows claims if you have another card.

You just can’t make money off a trip cancellation by double dipping – you are limited to your actual expenses and subject to the coverage caps.

Dealing with travel insurance claims

In my experience dealing with travel insurance provided through reward cards, you never know for certain what the insurance company will pay until you file a claim and have that claim work its way through the insurance company’s process.

You might try to contact Citi ahead of time and ask, but my guess is that whatever customer-service agent you reach on the phone will not know the specifics of the travel insurance’s terms and conditions and will not guarantee you that your plan will succeed.

Remember that the credit card issuer tends to outsource the insurance coverage to another company, so issuers might not be as familiar with the details of that insurance.

See related: Need to cancel a nonrefundable flight or hotel? You might have options

A third option: Buying separate coverage

While that is probably not the definitive answer you are looking for, there is no real harm in splitting the cost between two cards to give it a shot.

Odds that your trip will be canceled or you will fall seriously ill are probably small.

If you are still worried about having enough coverage, the safer move is to look into buying separate travel insurance.

You can probably receive a much more reliable idea of what is covered and what is not.

Dear Cashing In,

My husband and I are going on a cruise. I have both the Citi AAdvantage Platinum Select World Elite Mastercard and the Costco Anywhere Visa. Can I split our cruise expense and be covered by the travel protection of $5,000 for the Mastercard and the $3,000 for the Visa card? – Vera

 

Dear Vera,

This is an intriguing question – and a potentially ingenious idea on your part.

 

Many people probably have no idea that their reward credit cards come with travel protection benefits.

Airlines and travel providers routinely offer travelers the option of buying extra travel insurance at the time of purchase. But typically, if you have a rewards credit card, you already have at least some coverage in case something goes wrong.

 

See related: 11 credit card travel insurance benefits

 

H2 Travel benefits offered by rewards cards

 

This coverage varies by card and by card issuer, of course. Typically, reward cards come with insurance that covers costs such as an unanticipated and serious illness, trip cancellations and delays, and lost or delayed luggage.

 

-To be eligible, you have to have used the card to pay for the trip.

-You have to submit a claim and provide plenty of documentation.

-Usually, the credit card company outsources the work to an outside insurance company.

-Often, the coverage is less comprehensive than privately purchased travel insurance, but if you encounter problems with travel, it’s better than nothing.

 

H2 Coverage implications of paying trip with two different cards

In your case, you’re asking if you can split the cost between two cards – which both happen to come from Citi – and receive the full benefit of the protection.

The Citi AAdvantage card is limited to $5,000 in for trip interruption or cancellation coverage per person, while the Costco card caps its benefits at $3,000 per person.

 

In these situations, you can often figure out a lot by reading the terms and conditions of the coverage. They will explain any limitations or restrictions.

-In your case, they say that the coverage is limited to either the above amounts or the amount you charged on the card for the trip, whichever is less.

-Those terms also stipulate that the coverage is secondary to any other insurance you might have or to any reimbursements the travel provider might offer.

 

Those are the terms that the company offering the coverage is legally bound by, and there is nothing in the terms and conditions that explicitly disallows claims if you have another card.

You just can’t make money off a trip cancellation by double dipping – you are limited to your actual expenses and subject to the coverage caps.

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The editorial content on this page is based solely on the objective assessment of our writers and is not driven by advertising dollars. It has not been provided or commissioned by the credit card issuers. However, we may receive compensation when you click on links to products from our partners.

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