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Earn up to 100,000 bonus miles with the Capital One Venture Rewards Credit Card

Even with an annual fee, the Venture card offers solid rewards value thanks to its first-year bonus and ongoing rewards rate

Summary

New Venture cardholders can receive a 50,000-mile bonus after spending $3,000 in the first three months of card membership. Plus, heavy spenders have the opportunity to earn up to 100,000 miles in the first year. Add in an impressive ongoing rewards rate, and the card is a solid option for travelers.

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The Capital One® Venture® Rewards Credit Card is currently offering new cardholders the highest potential bonus in its history. For those who spend $3,000 in the first three months of card membership, the Venture is offering its standard 50,000-mile bonus. But, big spenders who hit $20,000 in the first 12 months can up the ante – to a total of 100,000 miles.

The spend threshold to reach the full 100,000-mile bonus is high, and it might be out of reach for many cardholders. But for those willing to pile all of their spending onto the Venture for the entirety of the first year, the rewards can be incredibly valuable.

Venture card changes

Previous offerUpdated offer
Sign-up bonus50,000 miles after $3,000 spend in the first 3 months50,000 miles after $3,000 spend in the first 3 months or 100,000 total miles after $20,000 spend in the first 12 months
Annual fee$0 for the first year, then $95$95 (fee no longer waived in first year)

Miles for every purchase

Along with a generous sign-up bonus, the Venture card lets cardholders earn 2 miles per dollar on all purchases. We value Capital One miles at 1 cent per mile when redeemed for travel – making the sign-up bonus worth approximately $1,000 (if you can meet the whole spend cap).

We estimate the average consumer’s spending at $15,900, which isn’t quite enough to meet the steep $20,000 requirement for the full 100,000-mile bonus. But, if you can manage to spend that much in a year, we estimate your first-year rewards value at about $1,305, once you subtract the annual fee.

Another big perk: There is no limit on the number of miles you can earn, and your rewards won’t expire for the life of your account.

Venture vs. VentureOne

Because they have such similar card names, you may be wondering what differentiates the Venture card from the VentureOne card. Take a look at our chart below to see how the cards compare side-by-side.

Capital One® Venture® Rewards Credit CardCapital One® VentureOne® Rewards Credit Card
Rewards rate2 miles per dollar on every purchase1.25 miles per dollar on every purchase
Sign-up bonus
  • 50,000 miles after $3,000 spend in first 3 months
  • 100,000 miles total after $20,000 spend in first 12 months
20,000 miles after $1,000 spend in first 3 months
Annual fee$95$0
Introductory offerNone0% on purchases for 12 months, then a 15.49% – 25.49% variable APR
Estimated value in first year ($15,900 spend)$723$399
Other benefits
  • No foreign transaction fees
  • 24-hour travel assistance services
  • Auto rental collision damage waiver
  • Travel accident insurance
  • Extended warranty

As you can see, while the Venture and VentureOne cards provide almost identical card benefits, the Venture card offers a considerably higher sign-up bonus and rewards rate than that of the VentureOne card.

Indeed, even with its annual fee factored in, you’ll likely earn more per year in ongoing rewards with the Venture card thanks to its 2-mile-per-dollar rewards rate on all purchases.

Let’s crunch the numbers: Based on the average person’s spending habits, you stand to earn around $223 in rewards in your second year as a Venture cardholder (2 miles per dollar earned on a $15,900 per year spend, minus the annual fee). With the VentureOne, you’d only earn about $198 on the same spend.

On the other hand, the Venture card does not offer an introductory APR on purchases. Because of this, the VentureOne card may be a better option if you plan to carry a card balance on purchases during the first 12 months.

See related: Capital One transfer partners

The editorial content below is based solely on the objective assessment of our writers and is not driven by advertising dollars. However, we do receive compensation when you click on links to products from our partners. Learn more about our advertising policy

Editorial Disclaimer

The editorial content on this page is based solely on the objective assessment of our writers and is not driven by advertising dollars. It has not been provided or commissioned by the credit card issuers. However, we may receive compensation when you click on links to products from our partners.

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Capital One Venture Rewards Credit Card vs. Capital One VentureOne Rewards Credit Card

At first glance, it may be difficult to see the difference between the Venture and VentureOne cards. Read on to see why the Venture card – even with its annual fee – may be the better choice for you.

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Credit Card Rate Report Updated: September 23rd, 2020
Business
13.91%
Airline
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