Reviews The Hyatt Credit Card from Chase review
The Hyatt Credit Card from Chase review

The Hyatt Credit Card from Chase review

Published: September 26, 2017
Advertiser Disclosure
Ratings Policy
Hotel Rating:
3.8 rating
3.8 rating
3.8 / 5
Rewards Value: 4.1
Annual Percentage Rate: 1.6
Rewards Flexibility: 4.1
Hotel Options: 2.5
Features: 4.0

In a nutshell:

Even though the Hyatt credit card’s earning scheme is not awe-inspiring, the sign-up and annual bonuses make this card more than worthwhile for Hyatt aficionados.

Rewards Rate

  • 3:1 Hyatt hotel purchases
  • 2:1 restaurants, directly purchased airfare, car rentals
  • 1:1 general purchases

Sign-up Bonus

  • 40,000 points if you spend $2,000 in first 3 months
  • 5,000 points when you add authorized user

Annual Bonus
Annual free night at Category 1-4 hotel (worth up to 15,000 points)

Annual Fee
$75

Average Yearly Rewards Value ($1,325 monthly spend)
$533

APR
16.99-23.99% (variable)

Rewards Redemption
Pros

  • Points don’t expire as long as card is active every 12 months
  • No blackout dates
  • Excellent value rewards chart
  • Redeem for hotel stays, room upgrades, restaurants and spas, car rentals, airfare
  • Pay with points plus cash, depending on availability
  • Can transfer Chase Ultimate Rewards points at 1:1 rate

Cons

  • No good uses outside of hotel redemptions or upgrades
  • Limited footprint

Hotel Options

  • Properties: 600
  • Countries served: 50+

Other Notable Features: Automatic Discoverist status, use card to earn credit toward diamond status, 10% point bonus, free Wi-Fi, late checkout, 72-hour room guarantee, purchase protection, trip cancellation and interruption insurance, lost luggage insurance, trip delay insurance, baggage delay insurance, travel and emergency assistance

Rewards Rating:
4.3 rating
4.3 rating
4.3 / 5
Rewards Value: 4.7
Annual Percentage Rate: 1.4
Rewards Flexibility: 4.2
Features: 4.0

In a nutshell:

For just $75 a year, the Hyatt card from Chase offers an outstanding amount of value for frequent travelers: New cardholders are awarded ample points on a variety of travel purchases, including airfare, car rentals and restaurant purchases.

Rewards Rate

  • 3:1 Hyatt hotel purchases
  • 2:1 restaurants, directly purchased airfare, car rentals
  • 1:1 general purchases

Sign-up Bonus

  • 40,000 points if you spend $2,000 in first 3 months
  • 5,000 points when you add authorized user

Annual Fee
$75

Average Yearly Rewards Value ($1,325 monthly spend)
$533

APR
16.99-23.99% (variable)

Rewards Redemption
Pros

  • Points don’t expire as long as card is active every 12 months
  • No blackout dates
  • Excellent value rewards chart
  • Redeem for hotel stays, room upgrades, restaurants and spas, car rentals, airfare
  • Pay with points plus cash, depending on availability
  • Can transfer Chase Ultimate Rewards points at 1:1 rate

Cons

  • No good uses outside of hotel redemptions or upgrades
  • Limited footprint

Other Notable Features: Automatic Discoverist status, use card to earn credit toward diamond status, 10% point bonus, free Wi-Fi, late checkout, 72-hour room guarantee, purchase protection, trip cancellation and interruption insurance, lost luggage insurance, trip delay insurance, baggage delay insurance, travel and emergency assistance

Travel Rating:
4.3 rating
4.3 rating
4.3 / 5
Rewards Value: 4.6
Annual Percentage Rate: 1.1
Rewards Flexibility: 4.2
Features: 4.0

In a nutshell:

With an above average rewards value and multiple opportunities for free hotel stays, including two free nights at the Hyatt of your choice in the card’s first year, this ultra generous Hyatt card earns our vote for one of the best hotel credit cards.

Rewards Rate

  • 3:1 Hyatt hotel purchases
  • 2:1 restaurants, directly purchased airfare, car rentals
  • 1:1 general purchases

Sign-up Bonus

  • 40,000 points if you spend $2,000 in first 3 months
  • 5,000 points when you add authorized user

Annual Fee
$75

Average Yearly Rewards Value ($1,325 monthly spend)
$533

APR
16.99-23.99% (variable)

Rewards Redemption
Pros

  • Points don’t expire as long as card is active every 12 months
  • No blackout dates
  • Excellent value rewards chart
  • Redeem for hotel stays, room upgrades, restaurants and spas, car rentals, airfare
  • Pay with points plus cash, depending on availability
  • Can transfer Chase Ultimate Rewards points at 1:1 rate

Cons

  • No good uses outside of hotel redemptions or upgrades
  • Limited footprint

Other Notable Features: Automatic Discoverist status, use card to earn credit toward diamond status, 10% point bonus, free Wi-Fi, late checkout, 72-hour room guarantee, purchase protection, trip cancellation and interruption insurance, lost luggage insurance, trip delay insurance, baggage delay insurance, travel and emergency assistance

While some hotel loyalty programs have been riding the devaluation wagon for years – making their loyal patrons wonder how to use points that are worth less and less – the Hyatt Gold Passport program has exercised an enviable self-restraint. Hyatt, too, has raised redemption rates, but its last major devaluation occurred in 2013. It seems that unlike many other hotel chains, Hyatt understands that loyalty goes both ways. The Hyatt Gold Passport program consistently has earned rave reviews from its devoted fans.

The Hyatt credit card packs quite a few benefits for a moderate annual fee, which is waived for the first year. Even with an average earning scheme, the price of admission is low and the value is pretty high. If you value elite perks, the card awards you platinum status even if you’ve never stayed at Hyatt properties before. If you are working on getting into the top diamond elite tier, the spending on the card can nudge you toward this goal as well.

Fair sign-up bonus
The Hyatt card recently changed its sign-up bonus, and it appears to be an improvement, depending on your perspective. In place of the two free nights that the card used to offer, you now get 40,000 points for signing up and spending $2,000 in the first three months. Though you no longer have the option to stretch the value of your bonus by splurging on a weekend at a high end hotel, the average value of the bonus has improved, and you no longer have to worry about using up a certificate that expires at the end of the year. Furthermore, you get 5,000 points after adding an authorized user. That’s enough points to book a free room at a Category 1 hotel.

The card also offers an annual bonus to loyal cardholders. You get one free night annually at a hotel in categories 1 through 4 – worth up to 15,000 points – for as long as you remain a card member. This benefit alone covers the $75 annual fee.

Average earning scheme
The earning scheme on the card is decent, if not spectacular. You get three points per dollar for Hyatt hotel purchases; two points for restaurant dining, directly purchased airfare and car rental; and one point for other purchases. The restaurant category in particular is a lucrative one and should help cardholders accumulate some extra points.

The annual fee is fairly high
The annual fee of $75 is a bit higher than average for a hotel co-branded credit card. However, the rewards and perks on this card more than outweigh the fee, making it well worth it for cardholders who do a moderate amount of spending and visit Hyatt brand hotels on a regular basis.

Flexible redemption options
Hyatt makes it fairly easy for cardholders to redeem rewards points. The Hyatt rewards chart is very sensible. Redemption rates begin at a very low 5,000 points for Category 1 hotels, and range up to 30,000 for the top-tier properties. Hyatt also includes a points-plus-cash option at participating properties, enabling you to cover part of your rewards stay with cash if you don’t have sufficient rewards points. The rates for points-plus-cash awards are reasonable, ranging between 2,500 points and 15,000 points. In addition, you can pay for suite upgrades with points, and the upgrade rates are reasonable as well.

Limited geographic footprint
On the downside, Hyatt is a relatively small hotel chain, although it’s only “small” compared to behemoths like Marriott, Hilton or IHG. Hyatt still has about 640 hotels in 52 countries. Although you will not find as many options as with the larger chains, you still have the flexibility to travel to many diverse locations around the globe.

Automatic elite status
Card members automatically qualify for Discoverist status with Hyatt. Unfortunately, Discoverist status does not offer a lot of great perks, but you will find some of them useful. You get a 10 percent bonus on rewards points with each hotel stay, expedited check-in, a preferred room when available, late checkout and premium in-room Internet. 

Reasons to sign up for it:

  • You are a current Hyatt Gold Passport member or plan to travel to locations with Hyatt brand hotels.
  • You are looking for a rewards card with a large sign-up bonus.
  • You want automatic Discoverist status.

How to use it:

  • Remember to spend $2,000 in the first three months and add an authorized user in order to get the sign-up bonuses.
  • Consider applying with a spouse or partner and add one another as authorized users to double all your bonuses. If you do so, you will get 80,000 points, up to two nights at a Category 1 hotel, and two more nights annually at hotels in categories 1 through 4.
  • You can use the Hyatt credit card freely in foreign countries, since it doesn’t carry a foreign-transaction fee.

Our reviews and best card recommendations are based on an objective rating process and are not driven by advertising dollars. However, we do receive compensation when you click on links to products from our partners. Learn more about our advertising policy

All reviews are prepared by CreditCards.com staff. Opinions expressed therein are solely those of the reviewer and have not been reviewed or approved by any advertiser. The information, including card rates and fees, presented in the review is accurate as of the date of the review. Check the data at the top of this page and the bank’s website for the most current information.

Responses to comments in the discussion section below are not provided, reviewed, approved, endorsed or commissioned by our financial partners. It is not our partner’s responsibility to ensure all posts or questions are answered.