BACK

Research and Statistics

Millennials think money management classes should be mandatory

Study shows 7 in 10 young adults believe high school didn’t prepare them well for the real world

Summary

When it comes to college prep, high school subjects like algebra are on the “gotta have it” list. But ask millennials what they think should actually be mandatory in high school and you get a list that’s peppered with personal finance topics.

The editorial content below is based solely on the objective assessment of our writers and is not driven by advertising dollars. However, we may receive compensation when you click on links to products from our partners. Learn more about our advertising policy.

The content on this page is accurate as of the posting date; however, some of the offers mentioned may have expired. Please see the bank’s website for the most current version of card offers; and please review our list of best credit cards, or use our CardMatch™ tool to find cards matched to your needs.

When it comes to college prep, high school subjects like algebra are on the “gotta have it” list. But ask millennials what they think should actually be mandatory in high school and you get a list that’s peppered with personal finance topics.

Nitro College surveyed more than 1,000 American millennials and found 69 percent of them believed high school did not properly prepare them for the real world. When asked what classes they would require for graduation, seven of the top 10 courses centered on money management.

A general personal finance class topped the list, with three-quarters (76 percent) of respondents indicating they would make it mandatory. That was followed by stock market basics (68 percent), filing taxes (58 percent) and income and careers (57 percent). Nutrition was the only top-five response not centered on money.

See related:  When, why, how should you graduate from a student credit card to a regular card?

Other desired financial courses in the top 10 were credit (54 percent), handling student debt (52 percent) and banking (52 percent).

On the flip side, a quarter of millennials said they found algebra to be the least valuable course to their personal life and job success, followed closely by geometry and chemistry.

Conducted via Amazon’s Mechanical Turk, Nitro’s online survey screened for millennials who had attended at least one year of public high school, with responses weighted to mirror the demographics of millennials nationwide. Nitro released the results in February.

What’s up next?

In Research and Statistics

Poll: 8 percent of U.S. parents have children with credit cards

Lots of U.S. children have access to credit cards, according to a new CreditCards.com poll. Hear experts’ opinions on whether that’s a good idea or not.

Published: March 24, 2019

See more stories
Credit Card Rate Report Updated: June 12th, 2019
Business
15.61%
Airline
17.54%
Cash Back
17.68%
Reward
17.57%
Student
17.79%

Questions or comments?

Contact us

Editorial corrections policies

Learn more

Join the Discussion

We encourage an active and insightful conversation among our users. Please help us keep our community civil and respectful. For your safety, do not disclose confidential or personal information such as bank account numbers or social security numbers. Anything you post may be disclosed, published, transmitted or reused.

The editorial content on CreditCards.com is not sponsored by any bank or credit card issuer. The journalists in the editorial department are separate from the company’s business operations. The comments posted below are not provided, reviewed or approved by any company mentioned in our editorial content. Additionally, any companies mentioned in the content do not assume responsibility to ensure that all posts and/or questions are answered.