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Which JetBlue credit card is best for me?

There are three different options, so evaluate your preferences before choosing

Summary

Depending how much of a frequent flyer you are – and if you’re willing to shell out an annual fee – the best airline card aligns with what you’re hoping to get out of it.

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Dear Cashing In,

I have started flying JetBlue a lot lately and am wondering if it would make sense to get a JetBlue credit card. I looked on their website and it looks like there are a few different ones. Which one is best? – Todd

Dear Todd,

If you find yourself flying on a particular airline a lot, it can make sense to explore the credit cards affiliated with that airline.

For instance, if you live in a city that is a hub airport, you should look into the credit cards associated with that carrier. Or if you fly a certain route on a particular airline repeatedly – say, on business trips to New York – then you should look up the card for that airline.

Check out all the answers from our credit card experts.

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See related: Rewards cards on smaller, budget airlines: Are they worth it?

Frequent flyer status

The more you fly on a given airline, the greater your rewards tend to be if you have a credit card with that airline. A lot of airline cards come with perks such as free checked bags and early boarding.

So, if you are a passenger mostly on a single airline, your opportunity to take advantage of those features is multiplied. Plus, it will be easier to redeem the frequent flyer miles you’ll be stockpiling.

As far as JetBlue goes, you are correct that you have a number of options. Barclaycard and JetBlue have partnered to offer three different cards that might appeal to frequent JetBlue flyers. Let’s compare them:

JetBlue credit cards: What you need to know

JetBlue card

  • Annual fee: None.
  • Sign-up bonus: 10,000 points after spending $1,000 in the first 90 days.
  • Earning: 3 points per dollar on JetBlue purchases, 2 points per dollar at restaurants and grocery stores and 1 point for everything else.
  • Other perks: 50 percent savings on in-flight cocktails and food purchases.

JetBlue Plus card

  • Annual fee: $99.
  • Sign-up bonus: 40,000 points after spending $1,000 in the first 90 days (and paying the annual fee).
  • Earning: 6 points per dollar on JetBlue purchases, 2 points per dollar at restaurants and grocery stores and 1 point for everything else.
  • Other perks: Free first checked bag when you use the card to purchase your flight tickets, 50 percent savings on in-flight cocktails and food purchases, 5,000 bonus points every year after your account anniversary and an annual $100 statement credit after buying a JetBlue vacation package (of $100 or more).

JetBlue Business card

  • Annual fee: $99.
  • Sign-up bonus: 40,000 points after spending $1,000 in first 90 days – and an additional 10,000 points when a purchase is made with an employee card in the first 90 days.
  • Earning: 6 points per dollar on JetBlue purchases, 2 points per dollar at restaurants and office supply stores and 1 point for everything else.
  • Other perks: Free first checked bag when you use the card to purchase your flight tickets, 50 percent savings on in-flight cocktails and food purchases, 5,000 bonus points every year after your account anniversary and an annual $100 statement credit after buying a JetBlue vacation package (of $100 or more).

You can see that the JetBlue Plus and the JetBlue Business cards are similar, in that they each have a $99 annual fee and comparable perks.

JetBlue Business might be slightly more generous, if you are able to qualify for it by having a business – or at least a hobby that you can declare as a business.

Which to choose

The real choice, then, is between the no-fee JetBlue card and one of the annual-fee alternatives. The main difference is that the JetBlue Plus and Business cards come with a free first checked bag and a heftier sign-up bonus. The main question you should ask yourself is: Do you fly JetBlue enough to justify paying $99 a year?

If you fly JetBlue regularly and often check bags, you will probably want one of the premium cards. Checking a bag on JetBlue starts at $30, so you can see that the card pays for itself if you check bags four or five times a year.

Even if you check bags less frequently than that, you might find the higher-priced card worth it because it comes with many more frequent flyer miles. The $99-a-year cards also earn more points on JetBlue purchases, and they come with 5,000 extra frequent flyer miles per year.

The best advice on how to pick an airline card is to think about how much you’re likely to fly on JetBlue, then figure out how much money you might save with each card. In this way, you’ll pick the card that is best for you.

Editorial Disclaimer

The editorial content on this page is based solely on the objective assessment of our writers and is not driven by advertising dollars. It has not been provided or commissioned by the credit card issuers. However, we may receive compensation when you click on links to products from our partners.

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