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How to request a credit limit increase with Bank of America

A higher credit line can benefit your credit score

Summary

Requesting a higher credit limit with Bank of America is a simple process, but make sure to do your research before reaching out to the issuer.

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A higher credit limit can translate into more spending power, more chances to earn rewards, and better credit – if you use it right. Even better, requesting a higher credit line is usually a simple process that won’t take much of your time.

Requesting a credit limit increase from Bank of America is no exception. You have a few options for how to do it, but whichever one you choose, make sure to have the right information prepared.

Here’s what you need to know about requesting a higher credit limit with Bank of America.

Eligibility requirements

Bank of America doesn’t have publicly listed eligibility requirements for a credit limit increase. However, there are guidelines you can use with the majority of issuers to improve the chances of having your request granted.

  • Have your credit card open for at least six months. It’s easier to get your credit card issuer to trust you with more credit when you have established a relationship.
  • Pay your credit card bills in full and on time. Your bank is less likely to extend more credit to you if you haven’t demonstrated you’re a responsible credit card user. Not to mention, late payments may negatively impact your credit score.
  • Wait at least six months between requests for a credit limit increase. If you ask for a higher credit line more often, your issuer might consider it a sign of financial distress.

While getting a credit limit increase is not guaranteed, following these tips can help you prove your creditworthiness and make your case when you contact your issuer.

Before you request a credit limit increase

Before you reach out to Bank of America to ask for more credit, make sure you have all the required information and know why you need a higher credit line.

It’s a good idea to start by checking your credit. Your credit score is a gauge of your financial responsibility that creditors use when determining whether to extend you credit.

But your credit is more than just a number – take a look at your credit report to get a full picture of your credit history. If there are any negative marks on your report, it’s best to be aware of them as they may prevent you from increasing your credit limit.

See related: Why your credit report matters more than your credit score

Then, you might want to consider why you’re requesting a higher credit line. When you contact the bank, you may be asked this question, too. Some valid reasons include lowering your credit utilization ratio, financing a big purchase or having your income increased.

Make sure you’re not requesting more credit simply to spend more. Not handling your higher credit line responsibly may lead to expensive debt, and high credit utilization can hurt your score.

Finally, know how much of an increase you’re going to ask for. While some banks can be very generous at times, it’s wise to only request a limit you can afford.

See related: 6 things to know before requesting a credit line increase

Process for requesting a credit limit increase

The process for requesting a credit limit increase with Bank of America can be rather quick. You may be approved right away or you may have to wait a few days if the bank requires additional information. It’s also simple, and there are three ways you can get a higher credit line: automatically, online or by phone.

Automatic credit line increase

Bank of America can increase your credit limit automatically if you’ve been handling your account well. While this is not guaranteed, keep an eye on your credit limit six months to a year after you’ve opened the account.

Requesting a higher limit online

Your account may be eligible to request a credit line increase online. To check if it is, sign in to online banking and select your credit card account. If your account is eligible, you will see the link to “Request a credit line increase” under “Card Details” in “Account Summary.” If it’s not there, you can call Bank of America and make a request over the phone.

bank of america credit increase

Calling customer service

Another way to ask for a credit line boost is to call the number on the back of your Bank of America card. Have all your information ready and be prepared to make your case.

While it may seem like more work, talking to a bank representative may be a better shot in getting a higher credit limit increase – or being approved altogether. If you’re worried about your approval odds, calling Bank of America is likely the right option for you.

It’s important to remember that a credit limit increase with Bank of America doesn’t trigger a hard inquiry. No matter if you request the increase or the bank initiates it, this won’t impact your credit score, which means it never hurts to try.

What to do if your request is denied

If your credit limit increase isn’t approved, don’t despair. Ask the bank why you didn’t qualify for the increase and start working on improving your chances for your next request.

Here are some steps you can follow to better your odds:

  • Work on your credit. Your credit health is essential to your relationships with lenders and banks. Make sure to pay your bills on time and lower your credit utilization ratio to improve your credit standing.
  • Use your Bank of America card regularly. The issuer is less likely to extend more credit to you if you rarely use your account.
  • Update your income in your online Bank of America account.
  • Consider making a request during a different time of year. A TransUnion study from 2019 revealed that credit limit increases are more common between January and May.

See related: Credit line increases most likely to happen early in the year

Pros and cons of a higher credit limit

A higher credit line can be good for your credit and financial health, but there are also certain risks associated with more borrowing power. Before asking for a credit line boost, consider the following pros and cons:

Pros

  • You can lower your credit utilization ratio, which can raise your credit score.
  • You’ll be able to fund larger purchases.
  • You can earn more rewards if you spend more.

Cons

  • A higher credit line may tempt you into spending more and accumulating debt.
  • There’s no guarantee your request will be granted.

Final thoughts

Getting a higher credit limit with Bank of America can be a great move if you’re working on your credit or looking to finance a large purchase. However, before contacting the bank, it’s important to have your information prepared and know why you’re requesting an increase. You want to avoid taking on more debt if it’s unnecessary.

Editorial Disclaimer

The editorial content on this page is based solely on the objective assessment of our writers and is not driven by advertising dollars. It has not been provided or commissioned by the credit card issuers. However, we may receive compensation when you click on links to products from our partners.

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