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Infographic: In divorce, women’s credit suffers more

Summary

More than half of recently divorced women said their credit score tanked during marriage, compared to just 42 percent for men

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Almost 6 in 10 recently divorced Americans say finances played a role in the breakup of their marriage, according to a recent survey by Experian. And ending the marriage didn’t necessarily put an end to the money stress or the credit damage, especially for women.

More than half of recently divorced women (54 percent) said their credit score declined during marriage, compared to just 42 percent for divorced men. Half of women also reported their former spouse had ruined their credit, while only 37 percent of men said the same.

Women also were more likely to say their ex’s credit score was a source of stress, at 36 percent versus 26 percent for men. In fact, only about a third (35 percent) of all respondents said they and their former spouse agreed on how to use credit as a couple.

Financial losses from the divorce process itself were significant, averaging $19,922 per divorced individual, with half of respondents expressing worry about their finances after the divorce. More than a third (34 percent) went so far as to say their divorce put them in financial ruin.

Fortunately, almost half of respondents (48 percent) say their credit has since improved. But they are now wary, with 4 in 10 saying they’ll never walk down the aisle again, and almost three-quarters (73 percent) saying that, if they do, it will only be with a partner who has good credit.

Credit reporting bureau Experian commissioned this online survey from Edelman Intelligence, targeting 500 adults nationwide who have divorced in the last five years. The survey data was collected in November 2016 and findings released by Experian in February.

See related: 5 ways an ex can ruin your credit during breakup, divorce, More infographics

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