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Is a Disney credit card worth getting before theme park visit?

Summary

Should you get a Disney credit card ahead of a trip to the land of Mickey, Minnie and their pals? Unless your family is a huge fan of Disney, there are more rewarding credit cards to pack for your vacation.

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Dear Cashing In,

I’m planning our first trip to Disney World in October. I saw that there is a Disney credit card. Would that be good to get, or are there others that would be better? – Stacy

Dear Stacy,

Disney can be a great vacation. There is a lot to enjoy for people of all ages, but the trip can be especially memorable for those with kids of a certain age. From Disney princesses to creative rides to fireworks and parades, it can be a family-friendly vacation.

Check out all the answers from our credit card experts.

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See related: Rewards card tips to cut the cost of a trip to Disney World

Costs add up quickly at Disney

Disney is adept at making the experience in its theme parks magical, but it is also very skilled at taking your money to create that magic. It is understandable to look for an edge on saving money on this kind of a vacation, given that admission to the Magic Kingdom starts at a little over $100 per day – more if you go during peak season, but less per day if you go multiple days. Orlando, Florida, can be an expensive trip. Disney knows loving parents will pay for the magic.

There are entire books and blogs devoted to saving money at Disney, recommending everything from staying at off-property hotels or condos to packing lunches. But let’s concern ourselves with examining the credit card reward possibilities and how they might save you money – and whether you can do better than the Disney reward cards.

Two Chase Disney credit cards

Chase offers two different Disney-branded credit cards. The more basic of the two is the Disney Rewards Visa card from Chase (no annual fee). It gives you a $50 statement credit after your first purchase, 10 percent savings on certain purchases at Disney stores and theme park merchandise stores, and 1 percent back on all purchases in Disney reward dollars – which can be redeemed at most Disney locations.

The more advanced Disney-branded card is Chase’s Disney Premier Visa (annual fee: $49). It gives you a $200 statement credit after spending $500 in three months and gives you 2 percent back at restaurants, gas stations, supermarkets and Disney purchases and 1 percent on everything else. It has the same merchandise discounts as the regular Disney Visa.

Both cards also allow you access to special character experiences – your chance to meet Prince Charming or Elsa from “Frozen.”

Those might sound mildly appealing if you are planning a Disney trip – particularly the Disney Premier. Although the Disney Premier card carries an annual fee, it also gives you more reward dollars and a more robust statement credit.

Better credit cards to take on your Disney trip

You can’t look at those cards in a vacuum – you have to judge them against other rewards cards available to you – and you can do better with other, non-Disney cards.

For instance, the Citi Double Cash Card (no annual fee) gives you 2 percent back (1 percent at purchase and 1 percent at payoff) in cash back on all purchases. You would likely come out ahead by using the Citi Double Cash for purchases instead of one of the Disney cards.

If you spend, for example, $5,000 a year on groceries and gas and $5,000 a year on other items, at the end of the year on the Disney Premier card you would have $150 in Disney dollars. Spend the same on Citi Double Cash, and you would have $200 in statement credits.

There are other cards, too, that can outperform the Disney cards – including hotel credit cards that give you free hotel nights and airline cards that earn frequent flyer miles that you might use to fly to Orlando. Those cards likely are worth more than the relatively meager rewards on the Disney cards.

Of course, other cards won’t get you access to those character experiences or the 10 percent merchandise discounts. Think hard about how much those perks are worth to you, survey the landscape of reward cards, and make a choice.

See related: Video: Ways to save on a Disney vacation

Disney can be a great vacation. There is a lot to enjoy for people of all ages, but the trip can be especially memorable for those with kids of a certain age. From Disney princesses to creative rides to fireworks and parades, it can be a family-friendly vacation.

Disney is adept at making the experience in its theme parks magical, but it is also very skilled at taking your money to create that magic. It is understandable to look for an edge on saving money on this kind of a vacation, given that admission to the Magic Kingdom starts at a little over $100 per day – more if you go during peak season, but less per day if you go multiple days. Orlando can be an expensive trip. Disney knows loving parents will pay for the magic.

There are entire books and blogs devoted to saving money at Disney, recommending everything from staying at off-property hotels or condos to packing lunches. But let’s concern ourselves with examining the credit card reward possibilities and how they might save you money – and whether you can do better than the Disney reward cards.

Chase offers two different Disney-branded credit cards. The more basic of the two is the Disney Visa (no annual fee). It gives you a $50 statement credit after your first purchase, 10 percent savings on certain purchases at Disney stores and theme park merchandise stores, and 1 percent back on all purchases in Disney reward dollars – which can be redeemed at most Disney locations.

The more advanced Disney-branded card is Chase’s Disney Premier Visa (annual fee: $49). It gives you a $200 statement credit after spending $500 in three months and gives you 2 percent back at restaurants, gas stations, supermarkets, and Disney purchases and 1 percent on all else. It has the same merchandise discounts as the regular Disney Visa. Both cards also allow you access to special character experiences – your chance to meet Prince Charming or Elsa from “Frozen.”

Those might sound mildly appealing if you are planning a Disney trip – particularly the Disney Premier. Although it carries an annual fee, it also gives you more reward dollars and a more robust statement credit.

But you can’t look at those cards in a vacuum – you have to judge them against other cards available to you. And you can do better with other, non-Disney cards.

For instance, the Citi Double Cash card (no annual fee) gives you 2 percent back in cash on all purchases. You would likely come out ahead by using that card for purchases instead of one of the Disney cards. For instance, if you spend $5,000 a year on groceries and gas and $5,000 a year on other items, at the end of the year on the Disney Premier you would have $150 in Disney dollars. Spend the same on Citi Double cash, and you would have $200 in statement credits.

There are other cards, too, that can outperform the Disney cards – including cards that give you free hotel nights and frequent flier miles that you might use to fly to Orlando. Those are likely worth more than the relatively meager rewards on the Disney cards.

Of course, other cards won’t get you access to those character experiences or the 10 percent merchandise discounts. Think hard about how much those are worth to you, survey the landscape of reward cards, and make a choice.

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Credit Card Rate Report Updated: November 13th, 2019
Business
15.14%
Airline
16.97%
Cash Back
17.16%
Reward
17.01%
Student
17.23%

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