Video: Medical identity theft victim speaks out

By Staff

Anndorie Cromar talks about how being a victim of medical identity theft wreaked havoc on her and her children's life:   

"ID theft turned my life upside down it nearly cost my custody of my children.

In February 2006, my drivers license was stolen from my car. Nothing could've prepared me for what was about to happen. Two months later, in April of 2006, my driver's license was used by a methamphetamine user. She went to a hospital and gave birth to a baby that subsequently tested positive for drugs.

Child Protective Services called me and they informed me that this baby that they believed I had had test positive for methamphetamine and they felt that my four children were in danger. This is how I learned that I was officially the victim of medical identity theft.

It was completely devastating. I was angry, confused, frustrated, terrified and it really left me not knowing who to trust or where I could go for help. I was really completely alone in this, but ultimately I recognized I just had to stay strong and fight to keep my kids with me.

I had to go to court; I had to take a DNA test; I had to hire an attorney.  My friends and family were questioned. My daughter was pulled out of school. Everybody knew that I was being investigated by Child Protective Services. It was humiliating.

My biggest fear throughout this whole time was that my children would be taken away and I would have to work for months to get them back. It was completely devastating.

In my case, I had a DNA test that was able to prove I had not had the baby. The woman who had the child was caught. These things really helped  me to resolve my case. That wouldn't be the same for everyone who is the victim of medical identity theft.

I wish I could say the nightmare was over but not too long ago I went to the pharmacy and had them look up a prescription for one of my kids. And this child still popped up in with my other kids.

I am just scared that I'm going to have an emergency someday and this is going to pop back up and create complications.  

Unfortunately, I don't see this crime being taken seriously and not a lot is being done to keep people safe. I fear that something really bad is going to have to happen to someone before this crime gets the attention it deserves."

See related: How to fight medical identity theft, What ID thieves do with the financial data they steal, Video:Dumpster divers can find your private data

Published: January 27, 2016

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Updated: 10-28-2016

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