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Back-to-school credit card advice for students, parents

Tips to help students and parents achieve credit card literacy

By David Munns

Back to school student credit card storiesCredit class will now please come to order. It's back-to-school time, and whether you're in school, financing someone else's education or preparing for post-graduation financial independence, we offer the resources you need.

Consider this collection of articles your credit education primer. It covers:

Pay close attention, class. While we won't quiz you, expect life to throw a massive test at you when you least expect it.



Financial literacy

Top 10 ways students ruin their credit
College can be a great time to enjoy independence and build a foundation for the future, or an opportunity to begin their careers with unnecessary credit card debt.

Top 10 ways students can build good credit
Becoming financially independent means learning how to be fiscally responsible. Building good credit is a must: It will help young people qualify for loans, auto insurance, rental applications, cell phone plans, and can even affect whether they get a job.

More colleges offer courses in money, debt management
Basic personal finance is not typically on the short list of required college courses, but universities are realizing that the more they teach students how to manage their money now, the more prepared they are to ward off debt in the future.




Safety and security

Kids' lunch money lost less often in cashless cafeteria lines
Getting your lunch money stolen is so 20th century. Today's school students pay for school lunches with ID cards and fingerprint scanners.

Protecting your computer -- and your identity -- on campus
Every 12 seconds, somewhere in the world, a laptop is stolen -- and students heading to college need to take some simple precautions to protect not only their computers, but all the sensitive information stored on them.

10 ways students can protect against identity theft
Don't think you've used your credit card (or your parent's) or Social Security number on your laptop? Think again. All of that data is stored somewhere within your system. Here are 10 ways to protect your computer against theft.



Cards on campus


Cashless colleges: Student IDs turn into payment systems
Today's student ID cards open doors to dorms and labs, earn discounts with local merchants, sub-in for loose change at vending and copy machines, and even help with the laundry.

3 must-ask questions for multiuse college campus cards
Campus cards, like anything involving money, are not free from potential pitfalls, and the cards' fees and policies can be as different as Buckeyes and Wolverines.

When is the right time to retire a student credit card?
Once you graduate, you may want to upgrade your high-interest, low credit limit student credit card with something a little better -- just don't cancel it!



Managing education costs


Moving your student loan to a credit card?
Struggling with student loans? Learn the options of transferring to credit.

Universities deal with tuition paid by credit card
With tuition costs rising and credit tightening, more students are opting to pull out the plastic to pay for their classes. Not all colleges like it.

529-linked credit cards help make college more affordable
New credit cards link to 529 plans and function like cash-back credit cards, putting rebates into a college savings plan.

How do we pay for college? Lots of borrowing
Students and parents say they fund college in a variety of ways, but borrowing is playing a big role.

Published: August 25, 2008


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Updated: 12-08-2016


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