CreditCards.com Visa credit cardsMasterCard credit cardsAmerican Express credit cardsDiscover credit cards

Wednesday, April 16th 2014

ADVERTISEMENT

Credit card interest rates move higher, near record levels

By Kate Tomasino

CreditCards.com's Weekly Rate Report
  Avg. APR Last week 6 months ago
National average 14.84% 14.83%
14.68%
Low interest 10.73%
10.73% 11.91%
Balance transfer 12.78%
12.76%
12.73%
Business 13.07%
13.07%
12.91%
Student
13.77%
13.77%
13.96%
Cash back  13.90%
13.87%
12.48%
Airline 14.31%
14.24%
14.24%
Reward  14.41%
14.40%
14.29%
Instant approval 15.99%
15.99%
15.99%
Bad credit 24.96%
24.96%
24.64%
Methodology: The national average credit card APR is comprised of 100 of the most popular credit cards in the country, including cards from dozens of leading U.S. issuers and representing every card category listed above. (Introductory, or teaser, rates are not included in the calculation.)
Source: CreditCards.com
Updated: June 22, 2011

Credit card interest rates rose slightly this week, edging closer to record heights.

The national average annual percentage rate (APR) on new card offers climbed to 14.84 percent, according to the CreditCards.com Weekly Credit Card Rate Report. It's the first such increase in more than a month, and it pushes the national average to its second highest level since CreditCards.com began tracking rates in 2007. The record is 14.85 percent, set in May.

The national average APR hasn't changed very often throughout 2011 -- 14 of 25 weeks this year have seen no movement at all. However, when it has changed, the direction has typically been up. Of the 11 national average APR moves we've seen this year, eight have been increases and just three have been decreases.

That's a big drop in volatility from this time last year. In the first 25 weeks of 2010, the national average failed to move only twice. It went up 13 times and down 10 times. This newfound stability may be due to banks and issuers finally finding stability in the wake of the Credit CARD Act -- many of the law's landmark reforms took effect in February 2010, sending issuers scrambling to adjust their businesses to the changes -- and a recovering economy.

This week, the national average increase was spurred by Barclays, which dropped one of the available APR ranges on one of its airline rewards cards. The bank had offered the U.S. Airways Premier World MasterCard with multiple ranges -- either 15.24 percent to 24.99 percent or 15.99 percent to 24.99 percent, depending on where the offer was viewed.

However, Barclays spokesman Kevin Sullivan said only the latter range is now being offered with the card. That means that the lowest available APR for the card has changed from 15.24 percent to 15.99 percent. Since we use the lowest rate in our average calculations, the change pushed the overall national average upward.

Some rates aren't changing, however. The Federal Reserve announced Wednesday that it will leave its benchmark lending rate unchanged. That matters to cardholders because if the federal funds rate increases, the prime rate increases by the same amount. And when the prime rate increases, the APRs on variable rate credit cards go up by the same amount, almost immediately. (Nearly all U.S. credit cards are variable rate cards, and nearly all of those have rates tied to prime.) However, if the Fed chooses to leave rates unchanged -- as it has done in every meeting since 2008 -- that means that only a major mistake, such as being 60 days late with a payment, can lead to a borrower seeing a sudden APR increase. Otherwise, the Credit CARD Act requires issuers give a cardholder at least 45 days' notice before implementing a rate increase. 

See related: An interactive guide to the Credit CARD Act

Published: June 22, 2011


If you are commenting using a Facebook account, your profile information may be displayed with your comment depending on your privacy settings. By leaving the 'Post to Facebook' box selected, your comment will be published to your Facebook profile in addition to the space below.

Three most recent Research, statistics stories:
  • Card debt falls in February – Credit card users cut their balances sharply in February 2014, even as personal income rose, says the Federal Reserve's monthly consumer credit report ...
  • What an interest rate increase will cost cardholders – Interest rates, at historic lows since 2008, are expected to start rising as soon as spring 2015, and a single 1 percentage point increase will cost U.S. credit card holders an estimated $7.6 billion a year ...
  • Card debt falls in January – Card balances reversed direction and fell in January, as consumers got hit by harsh weather and expiring jobless benefits ...

Share This Story




Follow Us!

Google+

Credit Card Rate Report

Updated: 04-16-2014

National Average 15.00%
Low Interest 10.37%
Balance Transfer 12.64%
Business 12.80%
Student 13.27%
Cash Back 14.84%
Reward 14.96%
Airline 15.30%
Bad Credit 22.73%
Instant Approval 28.00%

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
USA   |   UK   |   Australia   |   Canada
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT